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How do you rate Farabakan DVD Set? (login to rate)

♥ sucks
No votes
0%
♥♥ watchable
No votes
0%
♥♥♥ pretty good
1
17%
♥♥♥♥ really dig it
4
67%
♥♥♥♥♥ off the hook
1
17%
By bubudi
#4978
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this 2 dvd set is presented by guinean djembefola fara tolno, ex-soloist of merveilles d'afrique. also featuring fode bangoura (djembe), ismael bangoura (dunun) and mamady sano (dance). the first dvd has fara tolno teaching the different parts to yamama, guine fare, mane, kania soli, tomankan and lamban. the second cd captures a firey live performance with fara tolno, fode bangoura and ismael bangoura on percussion and mamady sano and fara tolno dancing on yamama, kania soli, tomankan, djole, tiriba, route de niger, kawa, gidamba, dounoungbe, bara and 'farabakan'. USD $60 at drumskull drums

these dvds are also sold separately for USD $30 each.
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By Dugafola
#5988
recording quality and editing is kinda bootsy on these DVDs, but the playing is very clear and audible.

fara and fode shred all over the performance dvd.

the instructional is good and covers some stuff not commonly taught like kindia(kanya) soli, mane and liberte.
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By michi
#5991
The performance DVD is nice to watch with great music, but produced very simply. (It's basically home video taken in what looks like someone's living room.)

The teaching DVD is good, but not brilliant in my opinion. I showed this one to Mohamed Bangoura when it first was published, and Mohamed was quite upset at a number of mistakes where Fara had deviated from the traditional pattern and Mohamed straight out said "That's wrong, how can he do that?" Mohamed said that he'd talk to Fara about this next time he'd meet him; I don't know whether he actually did... (From memory, one of Mohamed's objections was about Fara's version of Guinea Fare.)

Having said all that, this is definitely one of the better instructional DVDs around, IMO.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By michi
#6000
e2c wrote:Just curious - "deviated" how?

Was Fara playing versions from other geographical areas, or was he playing ballet versions of some rhythms, or...?
This was quite some time ago, well over a year, so I can't remember the details. It might come back to me if I watch the DVD right through again. But I do remember that Mohamed exclaimed "That's wrong, that's not how you play it" at one point. I think his objection was about the first djembe accompaniment. He then gave me quite long lecture about the importance of passing on traditional rhythms accurately. Mohamed was quite adamant about that, saying that if you claim to pass on a traditional rhythm, it has to be exactly right and unchanged. For rhythms you compose yourself, do what you like, and there is nothing wrong with composing new rhythms, but traditional ones have to be accurate.

I'm sorry, but that is all the detail I can dredge up from my memory right now.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By e2c
#6001
Thanks!

One of the reasons I'm asking is that, as far as I understand it, there are many regional (and far more local) variations in how parts are played. It strikes me as odd that Mohamed Bangoura would say that there is only one "correct" way... Maybe language is a complicating factor here? (Switching and "translating" from one to another, etc.)
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By Dugafola
#6002
e2c wrote:Thanks!

One of the reasons I'm asking is that, as far as I understand it, there are many regional (and far more local) variations in how parts are played. It strikes me as odd that Mohamed Bangoura would say that there is only one "correct" way... Maybe language is a complicating factor here? (Switching and "translating" from one to another, etc.)

Bangourake was in percussion de guinee jr...fara and fode were in les merveille d'afrique. i'm sure there's a dozens of ways you can play the first accompaniement to yoki.

funny that Bangourake is lecturing about passing on traditional rhythms correctly...his entire dununba disc are his own variations on the classics that he's pawning off as "traditional." he even ripped an entire dunun arrangement from Mamady and put it on his disc: Takosaba Flanan (takosaba 2)
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By michi
#6004
e2c wrote:Thanks!

One of the reasons I'm asking is that, as far as I understand it, there are many regional (and far more local) variations in how parts are played. It strikes me as odd that Mohamed Bangoura would say that there is only one "correct" way... Maybe language is a complicating factor here? (Switching and "translating" from one to another, etc.)
I agree, it is odd. Language wasn't an issue here though. Mohamed's English is good, and there was no way I could have misunderstood him.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By michi
#6005
Dugafola wrote:
e2c wrote:Thanks!
funny that Bangourake is lecturing about passing on traditional rhythms correctly...his entire dununba disc are his own variations on the classics that he's pawning off as "traditional." he even ripped an entire dunun arrangement from Mamady and put it on his disc: Takosaba Flanan (takosaba 2)
Hah, I didn't know that :) Maybe Mohamed needs to take a little of his own medicine? ;-)

Cheers,

Michi.
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By e2c
#6039
After having listened to the bulk of Fara's Rhythm Reference MP3s, I have to say that I'd be *very* surprised if he made "mistakes" of the kind MB claims he's made. If anything, he has multiple parts/arrangements (as taught by a variety of teachers) down cold - not to mention his own versions.
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By michi
#6040
e2c wrote:After having listened to the bulk of Fara's Rhythm Reference MP3s, I have to say that I'd be *very* surprised if he made "mistakes" of the kind MB claims he's made. If anything, he has multiple parts/arrangements (as taught by a variety of teachers) down cold - not to mention his own versions.
Yes, it seems weird to me too. Most rhythms have variations from region to region, and many have variations from village to village. It seems strange to talk about a single definitive version, considering that. But I related Mohamed's reaction accurately, there can be no doubt about that. Thinking back, this was after Mohamed published his first DVD (and I'm pretty sure before he published his second one). Maybe he felt he had to say something like this because he saw Fara's DVD as competition? Who knows--I'm speculating here.

Anyway, as far as I am concerned, both are awesome musicians who have forgotten more about this music than I will ever learn. I'm happy to learn from either of them :-)

Cheers,

Michi.
By steady
#6047
Hi Drum Brothers,
I have to get into this post since

1. I love the farabakan dvd set :dundun: so add that to the score please
2. I produced the 2 DVDs with and for Bangourake i.e. Mohamed bangoura.

I just spoke to Mohamed and he speaks actually very highly of Fara and yes "Fara's" Guinee Fare
is a bit different but in basis still the same. I know Bangourake for a while and ... actually sometimes
his English is not spot on. :D Yes, Bangourake is with certain things a traditionalist even though he is highly skilled in the Ballet Style of playing.
When Mamady Keita was here in Australia last year he forged a great friendship with Bangourake and myself. At that time Mamady and Bangourake were discussing even the fact that an arrangement of the Grand Master was on Bangourake's CD.
Mamady liked the CD and that version :D . To top it off, Mamady invited Bangourake to play on his production which will be out soon... yes, it's going to be a surprise.
About the Dununba CD, yes as Duga (mate, he is not really pawning it off) said they are traditional but with some of his own little arrangements through it. Actually also some stuff that he was taught
by the great Lamine Lopez.
On a personal level, not just as a djembefola but also as a human being Bangourake is a great soul.
There is also a reason that he get treated with a lot of respect in Guinea and this is simply for
the fact that Bangourake shows respect to others.
Anyway I am happy to learn from him, Mamady Keita, Fara (if I get the chance) and many other
great folas, teachers and masters.

WONTANERA, ( we are one i.e. together)

Steady Freddy