Discuss traditional rhythms, singing etc
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By Djembe-nerd
#11252
Are these Kuku parts ? I never heard these except the 3rd which I learnt starting from the base.

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By michi
#11255
Sad video... He never indicates where the pulse is so, for the uninitiated, the patterns are meaningless because people cannot know where they fit into the bar.

I have heard part 1, but not quite as he plays it. The version I know (from Epizo Bangoura, among others) is:
Code: Select all
b...b...t.t.tt..
1...2...3...4...
........^.......
Entry to the pattern during the call is on beat 3. I have also heard that same part played with a tone flam instead of a tone on beat 3.

Part 2 is a traditional Kuku part, but only what he describes as the "variation". It starts on the 1 with the pair of tones.

The guy's technique is nothing short of terrible though. It's amazing that, apparently, he thinks he's qualified to teach djembe. He even lists Mamady as one of his teachers on his website. I guess that means that he attended a workshop of Mamady's once...

Part 3 is also a traditional Kuku part. You can enter on the 1 with the bass, or you can enter on the 4-and with the slap. (There doesn't seem to be any hard and fast rule as to which entry you use. In part, it depends on what kind of intro is played first--sometimes, the slap on the 4-and gets in the way and destroys the effect of the intro, in which case you come in with the bass on the 1.)

Part 4 is not a traditional Kuku part, at least not to my knowledge. Instead, that part is played with Kassa (among others).

I'm afraid that this is simply yet another video of someone who imparts incorrect information and can't hit a djembe to save his life... :puke:

Cheers,

Michi.
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By Djembe-nerd
#11265
I have heard part 1, but not quite as he plays it. The version I know (from Epizo Bangoura, among others) is:
I know it the same way.
Part 2 is a traditional Kuku part, but only what he describes as the "variation". It starts on the 1 with the pair of tones.
Ok I know that one too, tu.tu_ta.tu.tu.ta, first time I saw it I thought he was saying 2 tones and 4 slaps.

Misguided information, there are comments on this video praising him, I guess they are all buddies :-)
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By dununbabe
#11312
weeeellll, to his credit, he DOES say that they are variations.
I think his technique might be a variation as well *cough* :roll:
he says that the rhythm comes from Guinea, but the Manian are in the Ivory Coast as well.
To truly know Kuku, one must travel to the forest region of Guinea or Ivory coast and study with the Manian, OR, learn from somebody who has been there!
Another point is that the djembes from the Manian ethnic group aren't even the same as the Malinke djembes, so, every Kuku pattern we play on Malinke djembes is a technically a variation anyway! :giggle:
By michel weelen
#11391
Jesus !!!! You see guys this is a problem.... Now everyone is claiming to be a teacher ....
his technique sucks ... & he doesn't give pulse reference to what he shows ... so it's bullshit for a beginner .... Beside that all the acc that he shows can be played on Kuku ... no problem ... Kuku comes from the forest, and it's already and adaptation off what they play there, on 5 heads drums ... Ever heard about "Djobi", great, graet drummer he leaves in N.Y & he plays 5 heads drum like a devil 8) 8) 8)
By Paul
#11396
I would say if hes been anywhere its Ghana by the sound and look of the drum... Actually I have some ideas as to why they are teaching this... Guinea sounds a bit hardcore what with the violence, visa restrictions and language barrier... Ghana is as chilled out as.. but US and UK tourists are demanding djembe, I know 2 kpanalogo masters who get them to bring over MK instructional videos because this is what tourists expect. Its sad alright cus kpanalogo is wicked...

In saying that this dude should know that... and WTF is he making a video for anyway..
User avatar
By michi
#11410
Paul wrote:but US and UK tourists are demanding djembe, I know 2 kpanalogo masters who get them to bring over MK instructional videos because this is what tourists expect. Its sad alright cus kpanalogo is wicked...
One of my teachers, Isaac "Tuza" Afutu, is from Ghana. He continuously laments that there are "djembes everywhere". On his tour to Ghana each year (highly recommended, BTW), he makes it a point to teach traditional Ghanaian rhythms, such kpanlogo, patcha, and kakachufa on treshi (kpanlogo) drums as well as Malinke rhythms. And, man, when skilled players hammer these out, they are every bit as powerful and captivating as the Malinke music.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By bops
#11412
Normally I would give props to a newcomer for posting a video of his or herself showing what they've learned so far, in the context of gathering feedback and constructive criticism. Since he didn't himself post it in this forum, he's not here to explain his goals with the video. In that regard, I'll hold off on giving constructive criticism until he joins the discussion.
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By michi
#11413
bops wrote:Normally I would give props to a newcomer for posting a video of his or herself showing what they've learned so far, in the context of gathering feedback and constructive criticism.
Yes, same here. He hardly bills himself as a newcomer in the YouTube presentation though, and his website indicates that he doesn't consider himself a newcomer, but a teacher.

Michi.
Last edited by michi on Wed Mar 10, 2010 1:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
By michel weelen
#11417
here is a pict about the drums i'm talkin about ... Djobi called them Topanoes ???? 8) 8) 8)
Attachments
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User avatar
By michi
#11419
here is a pict about the drums i'm talkin about ... Djobi called them Topanoes ????
I know them as planibala, from the Forest Region of Guinea. Bubudi mentioned that they go by other names as well. (I've been looking for more info on these drums and their history, but haven't been able to find anything beyond the name planibala.)

Michi.
Last edited by michi on Tue Mar 09, 2010 6:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
By bubudi
#11431
i have never heard them called 'topanoes'.

i do know that dr. djobi teaches a particular slap that we discussed in another thread, which he calls 'topalo'. the sound is in between a slap and a tone and it's a very distinctive sound, with some overtones to it. the topalo sound is central to a number of rhythms of the gouro people in the ivory coast (e.g. zaouli). some others that play that sound well include mamady keita, famoudou konate, nansady keita, thomas guei, petit adama diarra, mohamed diaby, mahiri edwards-keita and fode bangoura.
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By Dugafola
#11458
bubudi wrote:i have never heard them called 'topanoes'.

i do know that dr. djobi teaches a particular slap that we discussed in another thread, which he calls 'topalo'. the sound is in between a slap and a tone and it's a very distinctive sound, with some overtones to it. the topalo sound is central to a number of rhythms of the gouro people in the ivory coast (e.g. zaouli). some others that play that sound well include mamady keita, famoudou konate, nansady keita, thomas guei, petit adama diarra, mohamed diaby, mahiri edwards-keita and fode bangoura.
can you reference a recording in which FK uses this technique? ttrack number and min/sec please if you can.