Discuss traditional rhythms, singing etc
By Daniel Preissler
#13314
“There are three truths: my truth, your truth, and the truth.”

there're even many more for sure !!! d;-)

I didn't want to say your a dilettant, or if I have, I have to say wer're all dilettants, maybe on different levels (and depending on the actual subject).

P.S. There is more than just one love!

Daniel
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By the kid
#13320
So there's tree truths and one love... :lol:

And i've lost count of how many god's.... :rofl:

:mrgreen:
By HawaOuti
#13963
Interesting topic! I love all dundumba rhythms and try to learn more every time I go to Guinea.
I just want to bring up some thoughts:

If you are a musician you want to develop and create something new also, even traditionalists. So when there are some really good drummers (or dancers) in the party maybe you want to play this rhythm, even it is not really the idea of the party.
Or you want to try a new idea for a solo and tell your accompanists to play like this today. Or the dancers today are not really good, so you can play only two rhythms that they can dance.
Or a good dancer improvises something using another dances steps and what you play with it sounds really good. Then you end up using that thing later on... In twenty years that will be called "traditional"!
Of course there are some rhythms that are less likely to change, for example those in special occations that you don't play so often.
By Paul
#14301
Anyone know falla ka massi (not sure on spelling)

Dont know if its a seperate dununbe or just a link to change between two other rhythms... I learnt it to link kon and demosoni kelen.

Also gbunkundo, any idea on where to find notation on that..
Am i right in thinking the dununba is to the beat as in soko and the sanban is a double bell on the beat
as with the soko sanban bell...
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By Dugafola
#14303
fallikamassi is the name given in Baro. the melody may actually be from Baro but there are many variations of the same overall melody. i have only heard it in kon/dunungbe. it can be used as a 'break' in Kon or to transition to another dunun rhythm...not necessarily demosoni kelen. but since Kon is usually the first rhythm played at a dunun fete, the particular order of rhythms and how they used fallikamassi is determinant on each village.

for gbunkundo, check out Hamanah by mamady keita.
By Daniel Preissler
#14322
hello guys,
I think you're talking about what I know as konmasi (from Baro).
It's a part of kon/dundungbè not possible in other rythms and which exists in Baro, Koumana (8beats shorter) and Balato (even shorter, don't know if it's modern there). They may play it in Sangbarala, but just for fun before the dancers arrive.
It's a special part of kon/dundungbè, for some time, they will do this again and again, and there's always a PLAYED echauffement between, while the DANCED echauffement is this part itself (or one smaller part of this part ;-) ).
There is a very nice video from Koumana on youtube, that you might already know:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIEOPdxbOAM
We played the Baro version on our disc with Mansa, though I prefer the Koumana style.
you got the three parts:
1.waiting
2.echauffement (marching)
3.konmasi (or whatever ;-) with danced echauffement)
1.waiting
2.echauffement (marching)
3.konmasi (danced ech.)
...
then they go on to dance in the circle (while the konmasi filled part of kon is danced in lines from one end of the place to the other) with mostly kon or denmusoni

Billy has made this part on his second disc as a whole rythm, but I think he created this.

have a nice time
Daniel
By Paul
#14323
Nice one guys.. Thats the one...

Its particularly similar between 2.20 and 3.20 on the video..

After the the echauffment bit I was told you can use a regular kon sanban call and change rhythm though maybe that was just for the purpose of the workshop..

Koumana looks like the place to go...
By Daniel Preissler
#14328
Paul wrote:After the the echauffment bit I was told you can use a regular kon sanban call and change rhythm though maybe that was just for the purpose of the workshop..
no, that's right! but once they've started playing this part, they will do it several times.

yeah, Koumana is the easiest to get there (for it's next to the road) and they got some very nice little things (different denmusoni and soli and könöwulen echauffement...). But they have got a lot of quarrel, too (between Noundiarra Kourouma and his concurrent Nansady Keita). If you like got music and some more harmony (with maybe a bit less organization ;-) ), I would give you the advice to go to Babila, where my favourite solo player, Nansady Kourouma, lives (I keep repeating).

you saw him on Lukas' video from Fissadou (the guy who is sitting in the middle part of the 10 minutes) (channel: mamadykamara)
Fissadou is more or less the same, for they play together.

Greets from Freiburg
Daniel
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By Dugafola
#14330
yes....nansady kourouma!!! i have lots of footage of him...i will meet him one day.
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By Dugafola
#15249
Afoba wrote:hello bubudi,
silidun(d)un isn't very well known and the only village I know they play it is Koumana.
it's kind of between gbereduka and denmussonin, the dance is comparable to gbereduka, but without the long "chauffe" part each time and with twice going down to each side ("si" = sit).
So I would say it is the Koumana version of gbereduka. of course it can't be called gbereduka (for Koumana is in the Hamana region) and hamanadundun is already used for denmussonin sometimes. so if there wasn't this very special "sitting" part, people from elsewhere would probably call it kumanadundun d;-)
Grüße aus Deutschland
Daniel
i've seen this i think. it reminds me of a polka dance with all the up/down/up/down.
By Daniel Preissler
#15252
yeah, this is it! d:-)
have you seen the Kumana or the Baro dancers?
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By Dugafola
#15253
it was a fete at the house of mamadou keita du kourala.
By Daniel Preissler
#15254
this will be more or less the Kumana version then.
Cool, I haven't seen it there. I was there twice for dalamon but last time they did a lot of sankaranba and the "usual" stuff (dundungbè, denmusoni, gbada). The first time I don't remember (except the dya, which as very interesting).
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By Dugafola
#15256
Afoba wrote:this will be more or less the Kumana version then.
Cool, I haven't seen it there. I was there twice for dalamon but last time they did a lot of sankaranba and the "usual" stuff (dundungbè, denmusoni, gbada). The first time I don't remember (except the dya, which as very interesting).
yes! lots of sankaranba (donaba).
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By Dugafola
#15295
Dugafola wrote:it was a fete at the house of mamadou keita du kourala.
it should be Koumana, not Kourala. I got the names mixed up!
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