Discuss traditional rhythms, singing etc
By alanbuchanan
#37114
I had the fantastic Djembe Notes, but it's not available on the App Store anymore for some reason. I emailed the developer to ask how come it got pulled, but got no reply. :(

Are there any good apps for notating djembe and dun dun parts?
User avatar
By korman
#37118
You're right, the app is still on my phone, but no longer in the app store. It's a pity, with some refinement it could become a very useful tool!

Some time ago I wrote the developer email about how swing setting is implemented in ternary rhythms, but he did not answer. I then measured app's output in Audacity, and found out that
- 2-3 swing setting gives you SLS (30%-40%-30%), which to my limited knowledge is quite unlikely, and
- 3-2 swing results in LSS (40%-30%-30%) which I guess is quite usable, although not as common as LMS.
#37120
LSS (40 % - 30 % - 30 %) fits in with e.g. soboninkun and bao (MK versions)

The "standard" ternary swings are rather LSM (more or less 40-25-35 --> Soko, Djaa, Gidamba...), and for the shifted ones, SML (more or less 25-35-40 --> Dunumba family, Soli, Mendiani...). If the swing concerns only groups of two strokes, it's a LS swing like in jazz, about 60-40, and you can superimpose SML-swinged phrases (Wolosodon, Yankadi).

Don't know if it could interest someone, but I'm at the moment studying the different swings of the Gnawas, which are of subsaharian origin as everybody knows, and one of them is also of the LSM type, with a lot of variations on the Guembri (i.e. gnawa's lute) that are [very closely similar] identical to the rhythmic structures found in Djaa-family. This LSM swing is IMO one of the most important and should be part of the settings you're talking about.

Vincent