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Djembefola - Djembe Forum •dununba
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dununba

Posted: Fri Nov 28, 2014 11:49 pm
by flamba
Hi,

I started playing a few dundunba's recently.

As there are quite a number of dundunba's, I am wondering whether anybody has an overview or some literature. Is there a structured classification?

Thanks,
flamba.

Re: dununba

Posted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:42 am
by djembefeeling
to my knowledge, there is no structured analysis published on dununba rhythms but this one by Maarten Schepers:

http://djembe.drumset.free.fr/gbmain.htm

(see "books" I think it is availbable with rhythm traders in the US)

In addition, I'd recommend to buy the CDs of Mansa Camio - An Bada Sofoli and Mamady Keita - Hamana.

It is said that Dunudungbé (the "white" or "pure" drum) is the mother of all the other rhythms of that group. In Baro it is called Kon. I think the most important other traditional dununbas are Bandodjeli, Demusonikelen, Konowoulen, and Koudabadon. Due to the popularity of those rhythms among drumming tourists, I guess, lots of other dununbas were and still are inventet, so the number of dununbas is still growing.

Re: dununba

Posted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:50 am
by flamba
Thanks, Juergen(?), for the swift response. I'll look up your reference.

Yes, I played Konowulen and Kurabadon, but also learnt some others on workshops, e.g. Soma Sangyi, Konkonson.

In his workshop, Famadou drew a number of generations (each of which being for a certain age class of the village inhabitants). So, we played for example Konden or Balane, but most of these rhythms are not dundunba's I thought.

Thinking about the above and your statement that people invent new dundunba's: what makes you specify a rhythm a dundunba? Is it sufficient to have the typical kenkeni and the tatatutatata :-) ? There should be more, I suppose.

But may be I should first read before firing questions around... :?

Thanks
Frank

Re: dununba

Posted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 12:21 pm
by djembefeeling
flamba wrote:what makes you specify a rhythm a dundunba? Is it sufficient to have the typical kenkeni and the tatatutatata :-) ? There should be more, I suppose.
That's a good question, for it is so hard to answer (for me, at least).
The "tatatutatata", or as Famoudou called it: basa tin badaba (come to the dance place, big head(s) of the gecko), is not a traditional call, as far as I know. Calls are not traditional, anyway. And I don't think it was often used as a cut either. so this is - in it's generic places at least, not a good criterion to tell dununbas from other rhythms like Konden. And even the typical Kensedeni pattern can be played on other rhythms.

It must be the Kensedeni pattern plus something else, like the situation a rhythm is played for. For the invented dununbas it's the Kensedeni pattern plus basa tin badaba plus the fact that the inventors call it a dununba. I heard the speculation that Takonani was invented by Famoudou, or better: he simply took a dundun variation of Dunungbé to declare it a new rhythm. Famoudou and Mamady have been under enourmous pressure to come up with new material for those assiduous students attending almost every workshop of theirs. (Often, Famoudou takes a traditional song and creates a new rhythm for it, like Lolo. The rhythm sounds much like Fefo).
The same is true for infos on "traditional" drumming. I don't knoow if all that talk about specific dununbas and their connection to a specific generation is all true. I've learned to rather trust those who traveled for years to the villages of Hamana and picked up their stuff there.

Didn't you aks a while ago about notation for Soma Sangyi? The song is so beautiful...

sangban, starting on the bold |x.o|.x.||x.o|.x.|; variation: (xo)|.o.|o.o|.xo|.x.|
dunbun: |.oo|.xx|.oo|.oo|; variation (oo)|.o.|o.o|.oo|.oo|
x ist just the bell...

best, jürgen

Re: dununba

Posted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 11:17 pm
by davidognomo
In addition, I'd recommend to buy the CDs of Mansa Camio - An Bada Sofoli and Mamady Keita - Hamana.


I don't know about Mamady's Hamanah album... Unlike Mansa Camio's An Bada Foli, it's a bit "always the same", and it has (for me) like a "canned" feeling to it - the tracks always start very fast, and go directly to the point (the point being Mamady soloing). Mamady's solos repeat themselves from track to track, wich happens also in Mansa Camio's, but in Mansa Camio's you have all the environment of the fête, or at least you can feel something more like a fête situation, with rhythms evolving in transition to the next rhythm. You feel something alive in it.

Before studying MK's Hamanah, I would recommend all the dunumbas in Famoudou's Rhythmen der Malinké (from tr. 12 to 16) and all the dunumba material in all of his albums.

I listened to the Hamanah album a lot, but I don't find it musically apeasing. Nowadays I use it as an exercise. For listening it at the right tempo from the beginning of each track.
what makes you specify a rhythm a dundunba?


the kenkeni. the up-tempo structure in the dununs. the échauffement structure on sangban and dunumba. the échauffement's blocage. the phrasing of djembe solo with a lot of typical and specific phrases. eventually the tatatutatata.

Re: dununba

Posted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 11:20 pm
by gr3vans
Bolokada's 'Famille Dunnunba' -
http://www.earthcds.com/africa/west/gui ... unba.shtml


this is another good cd all for dunnubas.
not sure where its avail in europe... Jurgen?

Re: dununba

Posted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 11:25 pm
by davidognomo
gr3vans wrote:Bolokada's 'Famille Dunnunba' -
http://www.earthcds.com/africa/west/gui ... unba.shtml


this is another good cd all for dunnubas.
not sure where its avail in europe... Jurgen?


http://www.djembe-webshop.com/CD/Boloka ... ::376.html

Re: dununba

Posted: Thu Dec 19, 2019 1:18 pm
by korman
djembefeeling wrote:
Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:42 am
to my knowledge, there is no structured analysis published on dununba rhythms but this one by Maarten Schepers:
The books can be bought from M.Schepers directly http://www.djembe-books.com
I would not say it's analysis, but a good tuition book on Baro style (as played in mid '00s). A reliable source said that cultural info is not always correct to the detail, maybe because of translation issues from Malinke.
djembefeeling wrote:
Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:42 am
It is said that Dunudungbé (the "white" or "pure" drum) is the mother of all the other rhythms of that group. In Baro it is called Kon.
I heard the following names for Kon parts: normalfigur, echauffement, KonMaya, Nantalomba, KonMassi, Gbada, Gbadalaji
djembefeeling wrote:
Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:42 am
Due to the popularity of those rhythms among drumming tourists, I guess, lots of other dununbas were and still are inventet, so the number of dununbas is still growing.
Which is a pity, because I'd rather learn all the nuance of five rhythms rather than say I know fifty (but in reality just a part of each one).

Re: dununba

Posted: Fri Dec 20, 2019 6:28 pm
by Dugafola
korman wrote:
Thu Dec 19, 2019 1:18 pm

Which is a pity, because I'd rather learn all the nuance of five rhythms rather than say I know fifty (but in reality just a part of each one).
i echo your feelings.
from all my travels in upper guinea, the dununba rhythms are played the slowest in Baro. everywhere else i went, the tempos are faster...not conakry fast though.
davidognomo wrote:
I don't know about Mamady's Hamanah album... Unlike Mansa Camio's An Bada Foli, it's a bit "always the same", and it has (for me) like a "canned" feeling to it - the tracks always start very fast, and go directly to the point (the point being Mamady soloing). Mamady's solos repeat themselves from track to track, wich happens also in Mansa Camio's, but in Mansa Camio's you have all the environment of the fête, or at least you can feel something more like a fête situation, with rhythms evolving in transition to the next rhythm. You feel something alive in it.

Before studying MK's Hamanah, I would recommend all the dunumbas in Famoudou's Rhythmen der Malinké (from tr. 12 to 16) and all the dunumba material in all of his albums.

I listened to the Hamanah album a lot, but I don't find it musically apeasing. Nowadays I use it as an exercise. For listening it at the right tempo from the beginning of each track.
i also agree with david here. hamanah is great if you want the Mamady Keita style of solo...but the recording is a little sterile feeling even though N'fa famoudou also plays a lot on it. i had the pleasure to assist in the production of An Bada Sofoli and can't sing it's praises enough. it's my audio reference point for how dununba rhythms should be played.

Re: dununba

Posted: Fri Dec 20, 2019 8:11 pm
by korman
Also, I highly recommend Mansa's 2002 disc "Dundunba" (recorded in 1996, remixed and reissued in 2007), it does not have as much singing but is really a festival recording. The only gripe I have with it is that, unlike in "An bada sofoli", the tracks do not transition seamlessly.

Re: dununba

Posted: Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:12 pm
by Dugafola
nicE! i don't think i've heard that one yet.

Re: dununba

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 5:20 pm
by korman
Dugafola wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:12 pm
nicE! i don't think i've heard that one yet.
I bought it from the djembe-webshop in Berlin
https://www.djembe-webshop.com/CD/Mansa ... ::824.html