Discuss traditional rhythms, singing etc
By Samsuke
#39396
Hello friends.
Why is "Konowoulen 2" called "2"?
Is it because of the similarity of the melody?
Or is it the situation/context in which it is played?
Doesn't it have a name of its own?
Are they played in sequence?
I like this rhythm.
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By Dugafola
#39397
in other parts of upper guinea it's called "dji" or "djikan".

i'm not sure how it got "2." i will ask someone.
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By korman
#39398
Dugafola wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:13 pm
i'm not sure how it got "2." i will ask someone.
I think one of Mamady Keita certified teachers said that in Mamady’s book when there are several versions of a rhythm they are numbered chronologically, as Mamady learned them. For example Djaa 1 is from Siguiri (his region), and the Djaa 2 (from Kouroussa) he learned later.
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By Dugafola
#39399
korman wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 7:51 pm
Dugafola wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:13 pm
i'm not sure how it got "2." i will ask someone.
I think one of Mamady Keita certified teachers said that in Mamady’s book when there are several versions of a rhythm they are numbered chronologically, as Mamady learned them. For example Djaa 1 is from Siguiri (his region), and the Djaa 2 (from Kouroussa) he learned later.
that could be it! classic example of him not knowing the real name of rhythm and taking his creative liberties to rename/repackage it as something else.
By Samsuke
#39405
Do you think Konowoulen "1" and "2" are both recognized as "Konowoulen" by those livng in Hamana?
Do they have connections, culturally or musically?

What I really want to know is, not just why the rhythm is called "2", but "Are they both Konowoulen?"

There sholud be enough reason it came to be called "2".
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By korman
#39406
Samsuke wrote:
Sat Apr 13, 2019 5:23 am
What I really want to know is, not just why the rhythm is called "2", but "Are they both Konowoulen?"
I'm certainly no expert on this, but from what i've heard it ("Konowulen 2") is a different piece.
On Mansa Camio's discs it is always called Dji, and in Maarten Schepers book as well.

Bear in mind, though, that giving specific names to pieces seems to be more of a western thing, than part of the village culture itself.

By the way, have a look at the "old rhythm of the month" part of the forum, there is a whole section on konowulen.