Discuss traditional rhythms, singing etc
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By boromir76
#38522
Hi, everyone.

I have been watching this video of Kuku.


One thing that counfuses me and also puzzles a bit, is the dundun playing by Dramane Kone. Dramane plays what look's like dundun variation that stretches across two bars, and is quite familiar and popular. The thing that is interesting is that he does not strictly follow this two bar dundun line all the way, but breaks it few times during the playing and starts whole circle differently as it should be respectively. My question is: Should be two bar dundun line in this case considered and played all the time when playing, or is it OK if this two bar cycle is not considered so rigidly?
Last edited by boromir76 on Fri Jan 19, 2018 2:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By djembefeeling
#38523
Hi Boromir,

this is Dramané Koné playing, so we should safely asume that it's legit. But your question is legit, too. The way I see it is that Kuku in general has a cycle of 4 beats, not 8. But with MK the 8 beat cycle seems to have became popular. My best guess is that originally Kuku had a cycle of only 2 beats, just like Dansa consisting only of the tressilo of the Sangban:

o.|o..m|..o.|

The Dundun is only for embellishment. Now, what you do and are "allowed" to do with the Dundun is up to you and how you understand the cycle. If you think of it as a 4 beat cycle, you can mostly play a line that includes two cycles, but occasionally come back to one. When a guy does that, personally it would disturb me somehow while doing some solo patterns around that, because I pretty much link into the dunun lines. My feeling for the form resp. the cycle would be disturbed. But when communication between the different instruments is limited and they don't correspond, like the solo is doing mostly wara wara, it doesn't really matter, does it?!.
User avatar
By korman
#38524
Isn't Kuku one of those rhythms which weren't originally played on dunun at all? So, all dunun parts are an adaptation, then.
Actually, sangban and kenkeni combined are very close to second djembe accompaniment.
User avatar
By boromir76
#38525
djembefeeling wrote:
Fri Jan 19, 2018 12:18 pm
When a guy does that, personally it would disturb me somehow while doing some solo patterns around that, because I pretty much link into the dunun lines. My feeling for the form resp. the cycle would be disturbed. But when communication between the different instruments is limited and they don't correspond, like the solo is doing mostly wara wara, it doesn't really matter, does it?!.
Yes, it is a matter of taste and probably depends also on specific playing situation, I guess. The soloing guy in this video is making very dense solo's, with litlle to no pauses, therefore, the whole 8 bar dun cycle can not even make such an impact as a whole in this situation. But if there would be someone who is soloing much more "minimalistic", using less strokes, making more and bigger pauses, the disturbance's in cycle would be much more obvious...
User avatar
By djembefeeling
#38526
korman wrote:Isn't Kuku one of those rhythms which weren't originally played on dunun at all? So, all dunun parts are an adaptation, then.
Actually, sangban and kenkeni combined are very close to second djembe accompaniment.
I guess you are right, heard so, too. That would corroborate my assumption that it originally was a two beat cycle in tressilo form like most of the accompaniments.
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By Dugafola
#38847
yes. all the dun parts are adapted as far as i know. i think traditionally, you'll here a lot of jembe solo phrases that sound just like the dunun phrase that dramane plays.