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Core Repertoire

Posted: Wed Oct 05, 2011 6:08 pm
by Carl
Something I've been mulling over for a few months...

I came across a list of jazz tunes compiled by asking 4 or 5 jazz teachers the following question.
"what 100 tunes would you assume someone would know at a gig" (assuming you have never met them)

Each of the 5 teachers had a slightly different list, but they all had the same 10 - 20 core songs in their list.

I have a few students who have been playing for quite a while, but they all seem to have the weakness of only "knowing" the current tunes. Usually 3 - 5 tunes in their current setlist. I've gotten it up to 10 tunes for a show, but they focused on "their part" and not so much knowing all of the parts for each tune.

So my question for the forum is this:
'If you were responsible for making sure someone knew at least 5 tunes, what 5 tunes would you "make sure" that they knew?'

To rephrase, what are the 5 "most important" tunes for someone to learn, assuming that they are a serious student.

to clarify, I am not saying which are the 1st 5 "beginner" tunes. For example, I would put Soli-Rapide as #1 because it is important culturally, and fairly easy, however I would also feel compelled to have Dunungbe in the list as well, because of the importance of that style in my personal history of the music.

Here are my 5 (I am still developing this, so my answers might be different tomorrow):
Soli as above
Dunungbe as above
Kasa because of it's relevance to farming/music for work
Soko/Solidesmanian because of the djembe solos (not sure if I'd pick one over the other at this point)
Zaouli because of the breaks.

so my bias is mixed between History and technique.

Your thoughts?
C

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Wed Oct 05, 2011 9:58 pm
by djemberay
I've thought about this too. At times my core has centered around dance classes. It seems like there is a pretty common core of class dance rhythms that folks (here in the US at least) tend to know and dance. Off the top of my head:

- Soli Rapide
- Mendiani
- Djole
- Yankadi/Makru
- Lamban
- Dununbas
- Kakilambe
- Tiriba
- Djansa
- Sofa
- Kassa
and copping from Dug's list:
- Sinte
- Kuku (how could I forget?)
- Sorsornet
- Soko

It would be interesting to get others input on the core "dance list."

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Wed Oct 05, 2011 10:34 pm
by Dugafola
for dance classes around my parts:

Soli
mendiani
kassa
kuku
sinte
yankadi/makru
fula fare
sunu(senegal & mali versions)
dansa
dununba
yoki
yamama
sofa
soko

if you can play all parts of all of those rhythms, you'd be in good shape around here.

but for 5 rhythms that are somewhat essential to learn:
soli (all variants)
mendiani (all variants)
dununba (all variants)
dansa
kassa (all variants)

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 1:45 am
by Jessie
Soli
Kassa
Soko
Dundunba
Mendiani

After these, my list would go to the rhythms that are more unique unto themselves and/or they have a call that is unique for that rhythm. Such as (but not limited to):

Sorconet
Sinte
Yankadi
Guinea Fare
Mane
Yamama
Lamban


Then onto other rhythms that represent different rhythmic fundamentals that might trip you up if you've never experienced them.
Konkoba
Sobononikun
Wassalon
Djabara
Kassa ni Sorro

If you could play all these, you are pretty much ready for anything Guinea style.

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:37 pm
by djembefeeling
Soliba
Kassa
Dunungbe
Soli
Dyia

-- one rhythm for every family and subgroups.

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 4:32 am
by studydjembe
Weighing in on the Malian front....
We are familiar with rhythms commonly
played at ceremonies in Bamako and Kayes,
where we have spent the most amount of time.
This "long" list represents the essentials:

1. Maraka [Marakadon/DembaFoli/Sigandi]
2. Suku [Soli rapide] + Farabakan
3. Sunu [Goi/Kaarta Sunu/Maraca Sunu]
4. N'gri [Wassulunka/Kirin]
5. Dansa
6. Sandia [Jelifoli/Lamba]
7. Tonsole [Komo*/Komofoli/Maraboutfoli]
8. Sogoninku [Soboninkun]
9. Madan [Djagbe]
10. Garankefoli
11. Wolosodon [Woloso/Jonfoli/Jondon]
12. Soli (similar to Maribayassa) [Fura/Furasi]

*people nowadays refer to "tonsole" as komo
but they are actually not the same


The short list:
Versions of the following rhythms are also played in guinea.
It is a pretty diverse selection of swings and feels. And
they are taught in the United States and Europe.

1. Mendianni
2. Suku
3. Dansa
4. Sunu
5. Maraka

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:01 pm
by Daniel Preissler
d:-)
'If you were responsible for making sure someone knew at least 5 tunes, what 5 tunes would you "make sure" that they knew?' To rephrase, what are the 5 "most important" tunes for someone to learn, assuming that they are a serious student. to clarify, I am not saying which are the 1st 5 "beginner" tunes.
not bad lists, guys!
Most of you mainly followed the idea of taking (one of) the most important rhythm(s) of several fêtes, and me too, I will do so. I will then consider both, relevance in traditional fêtes (1) AND relevance and ability of playing these rhythms overseas (EU, US, ...). Easier one in ().

fêtes who dances rhythm to learn ("easily")
soli and women fêtes women Soli (Soliba=Balakulandyan)
Dundunba men Dundungbè (Könöwulen)
Kassa and féticheurs men Soro (dto.)
Dya girls Dya (Landio)
Konden (2 occasions) young men OR mask(s) Konden (Konden "1" de Babila)

So we have at least one occasion for every group (it hurts a bit that Mamaya/women, Den/young girls performing and Sofa/old men are missing, but we said 5) and can include the circumcision festivity (for all), a féticheur fête and some mask dancing with only 5 rhythms. In fact it's about these 9 rhythms that I've done most in class over the last years, that's to say I follow the same idea in reality d;-) I would enlarge the list putting Den (or Gundian/Manamba), so one of the 2 Mendiani ternaries.

Just as everytime this can only be the Hamana, Gberedu and Kankan list.
Have a nice evening,
Daniel

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:56 pm
by Daniel Preissler
hm, didn't work the way I wanted it to show up in the post...

1)
(A)fêtes: soli and women fêtes

(2)who dances: women

(3)rhythm to learn: Soli

(4)rhythm to learn "easily" (Soliba=Balakulandyan)

2)
(A): Dundunba
(B): men
(C): Dundungbè
(D): Könöwulen

3)
(A) Kassa and féticheurs
(B) men
(C) Soro
(D) dto.

4)
(A) Dya
(B) girls
(C) Dya
(D) Landio

5)
(A) Konden
(B) (2 occasions) young men OR mask(s)
(C) Konden
(D) Konden "1" de Babila

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:14 pm
by Daniel Preissler
to break it down:

soli
dundungbè
soro
dya
konden

or easier:

soliba/balaklandyan
könöwulen
soro
landio
konden de babila

d;-)

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 11:19 am
by Daniel Preissler
hello guys,
well, I'm quite convinced by my own list and I was very happy with yours...
Now, since no one reacted on my posting, I'm wondering a bit, if you thought that my list is great and everyone's going to "copy" this, or if all of you think it's total rubbish and/or exaggerating to mix thoese cultural points while most people overseas (from the african pov) just want to play together and maybe for some dance classes...
I just that Jürgen, who's list is quite the same as mine and which I hadn't remarked before (sorry!), had the same ideas. What about you others?
Greets, D

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:54 pm
by rachelnguyen

The short list:
Versions of the following rhythms are also played in guinea.
It is a pretty diverse selection of swings and feels. And
they are taught in the United States and Europe.

1. Mendianni
2. Suku
3. Dansa
4. Sunu
5. Maraka
Around here, among the Mali teachers I have encountered the top 5 would probably be:

Dansa
Maraka
Mendiani
Madan
Wolosso.... (this last one is hard to pick. It is a distant 5th, I think.)

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 5:18 pm
by djembefeeling
rachelnguyen wrote:Around here, among the Mali teachers I have encountered the top 5 would probably be: Dansa, Maraka, Mendiani, Madan, Wolosso
hmm, don't know, what about the four different swing types? Dansa and Madan would be the same, while Polaks swing type C (with the long duration between the first and the second puls) is not present. Polak teaches as the first 5 rhythms a core repertoire like this:

Maraka
Madan
Mendiani
Sunun
N'Gri/ Kirin

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 10:18 pm
by Daniel Preissler
For presentations, Polak likes using Dansa, Suku and Maraka, I think (one reason is that they are among the most played on fêtes in BKO). But this is a more cultural approach.
For classes (for good pupils!) it makes sense to do at least one of every family (for beginners I would stick to one or two families for a long time).

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 2:28 am
by michi
Another way to slice it up would be by region/ethnicity:
  • Susu: Guinea Fare/Yoki/Mane, Yankadi/Macru (take your pick)
  • Gouro: Zaouli
  • Kassounke: Djansa
  • Baoule: Abondan
  • Toma: Bao
  • Temine: Djole
  • Landouma: Tiriba
  • Bambara: Tansole
  • Manian: Kuku
  • Baga: Kakilambe/Sorsonet
  • Nalu: Sinte
  • Senufo: N'Goron
  • Malinke: Dunungbe
Yes, I know, that's way more than five :)

If you really press me to make it five, I'd pick:
  • Soli rapide (circumcision)
  • Dunungbe (men)
  • Mendiani (women)
  • Kassa (harvest)
  • Konden (mask)
Cheers,

Michi.

Re: Core Repertoire

Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 6:21 am
by bkidd
well i've definitely enjoyed seeing the lists people have come up with. maybe it's a good thing that there's a lot of overlap.

best,
-brian