A place for teachers to discuss issues to do with teaching
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By Dugafola
#7299
bubudi wrote: my suggestion would be denba. it's the rhythm of mothers and comes from the soninke (maraka) ethnic group in the kayes region of mali. the rhythm is played at weddings and most popular festivals. it has made its way throughout malinke country, where they call it maraka foli. sega sidibe says this rhythm is called denba (meaning 'mother'). there are some other rhythms that are also called maraka foli so calling it denba foli avoids confusion. you will see clips of this rhythm on youtube and on several cds.
this is also played in upper guinea although the rhythm is completely different. it's one of the 3 fetes that lead up to a marriage, the others being djalaban and the safinamalo.
balakulandjan is not specific to women.
the song is about children and giving birth. i'd say it's applicable to women mostly.

others that i remember: dusu, sire, sira, koudani.
guedom wrote:Bundiani is another one!
bundiani, mendiani, den don, den foly, afia, manamba are all pretty much synonymous. there's typically a progression in the music/fete in which the various versions of the aforementioned are played. some masters will say they are one in the same, while others will say they are different.

my take is that they are a family of rhythms. in hamanah, you can hear the names bundiani, mendiani and den all refer to the same rhythm. In parts of Sankaran, if you say Mendiani, they won't know what it is, but if you say Den Foly, then you'll hear what we all know as Mendiani. go further south in sankaran, and mendiani is the common name. Afia and Manamba(competition dancing) are different names for the same rhythm. you'll hear Afia in parts of Sankaran and Manamba in Hamanah and Gberedu. in the southern reaches of sankaran, they'll play the afia/manamba parts as variations on their mendiani. they play den don for the competition phase of the mendiani fete.

now there's another rhythm that's played around Kouroussa that's played just like mendiani but with a dununba kenkeni. i'm still trying to figure out what's going on with that one...

my sources for the above information are Famoudou Konate, Wadaba Kourouma, and Bolokada Conde. i was lucky enough observe a full moon mendiani in the sankaran region during my last trip to guinea.
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By e2c
#7303
Duga, thanks for all the info.!

I'd agree that balakulandjan is applicable to women, too - after all, it's not the guys who get pregnant and give birth. ;)
i was lucky enough observe a full moon mendiani in the sankaran region during my last trip to guinea.
How/why does the full moon figure into it? Are things notably different at that time than at other times?
By Garvin
#7359
I taught Moribayassa today. Awesome rhythm for beginners.

It was a perfect autumn day in Northern Michigan. We had a fire tucked right in at the treeline of a large backyard. We were shielded from the breeze and the sun was shining. It was comfortable and very fun for everyone. The trees were bright orange and red and the drums sounded awesome. I was super impressed at the groups ability to pickup the parts. You could tell they had a good relationship as co-workers and they were completely open and uninhibited about the whole thing, so it was great. Lots of laughter and respect all the way around.

Again, thanks for all your help here. You guys rock!
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By Carl
#7360
Ok, that's weird...

I just taught Moribayassa tonight as well... it's probably been 4 or 5 years since I taught this tune.

Good tune for beginners (at beginner tempo... :twisted: )
Interesting story and fun to play

Pretty easy break to be stolen off of Mamady's CD.

Had a good time starting off some absolute beginners. It's been a while, it's good to keep the teaching chops in shape.

Peace,
C
By Paul
#7391
Ok its for a womens hospice group.. I presume they are not commited djembefolas..
Mendiani, dununba sound a little hard core to me..

Go with gine fare, even just the first half to start bs bs tt ss bs bs tt ss.
Its fun and groovy and easy to add some simple dunun patterns.
By bubudi
#7395
Dugafola wrote:
balakulandjan is not specific to women.
the song is about children and giving birth. i'd say it's applicable to women mostly.
i meant to say that the contexts in which the rhythm is played are not specific to women. i agree the song very much relates to women.
bundiani, mendiani, den don, den foly, afia, manamba are all pretty much synonymous.
that's dangerous ground... depends who you ask.
there's typically a progression in the music/fete in which the various versions of the aforementioned are played. some masters will say they are one in the same, while others will say they are different.
good points. for instance, in baro village they play denabendunun on the way to the dance space for the bundiani fete, with the girls on the shoulders of the young men. then the bundiani (mendiani) rhythm is played and the girls dance on the ground. after a while, manamba rhythm is played and the girls dance the more explosive dance style that you see done for mendiani in the ballets, swinging their horse-hair attributes (that look a bit like feather dusters).

your experience in sankaran was different as it is in most other villages. just as in baro they seem to do things differently from kouroussa or koumana.

variety is the spice of life.
By bubudi
#7396
Paul wrote:Go with gine fare, even just the first half to start bs bs tt ss bs bs tt ss.
Its fun and groovy and easy to add some simple dunun patterns.
i think you'll find garvin already taught the group moribayassa. good beginners' rhythm with a nice story and easy breaks and song.

yoki (guinee fare) rocks, but is more suitable for intermediates imo.
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By Dugafola
#7402
bubudi wrote:
bundiani, mendiani, den don, den foly, afia, manamba are all pretty much synonymous.
that's dangerous ground... depends who you ask.
if you ask me, that's what i'll say. it's all the same family of music.

your experience in sankaran was different as it is in most other villages. just as in baro they seem to do things differently from kouroussa or koumana.

variety is the spice of life.
i never commented on my experience in sankaran other than saying that i observed it.
By bubudi
#7410
Dugafola wrote:i never commented on my experience in sankaran other than saying that i observed it.
my mistake, i thought when you wrote all that stuff about how they do things in different parts of sankaran that it came from your experience.
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By guedom
#13780
Dugafola wrote: others that i remember: dusu, sire, sira, koudani.
Hi Dugafola, where I can listen dusu, do you know? I have a friend who learnt it from Famoudou Konaté.
Is possible that this rhythm is a bambara one? has this rhythm other names?

I found a Bambara's maternity sculture called Gwandusu

Image

Plus info about Bambara Gwan society and this sculture here
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By tanamasi
#13933
while we're at it, can anyone think of any other rhythms for women?
zaoli is another great one, created to honor women :)
and gidamba is part of baby naming ceremonies according to Mamady's book - Famoudou's book also includes the rhythm but does not mention such a background, as far as I remember.

Dusu, judging from the background, might not be so related to bambara - though it's difficult to tell. It's a rhythm linking baro and siguiri, due to a marriage between a woman from siguiri and a man from baro. at least that's the story of the song. the rhythm might have sightly different background. it is difficult to tell whether Gwandusu might be related to Dusu given the amount of info available... anyone on this?

Cheers
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By Dugafola
#13934
tanamasi wrote:
while we're at it, can anyone think of any other rhythms for women?
zaoli is another great one, created to honor women :)
and gidamba is part of baby naming ceremonies according to Mamady's book - Famoudou's book also includes the rhythm but does not mention such a background, as far as I remember.

Dusu, judging from the background, might not be so related to bambara - though it's difficult to tell. It's a rhythm linking baro and siguiri, due to a marriage between a woman from siguiri and a man from baro. at least that's the story of the song. the rhythm might have sightly different background. it is difficult to tell whether Gwandusu might be related to Dusu given the amount of info available... anyone on this?

Cheers
tanamasi - did you learn the rhythm from FK?

i have notes on the rhythm I can dig up. i know that when we worked on it, he initially showed the dununba doing both upbeat and downbeat shuffles but then later corrected it to be completey upbeat/offtime.

Dusu is a nickname for ...it's on the tip of my tongue... :p
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By tanamasi
#13936
Dugafola wrote: tanamasi - did you learn the rhythm from FK?

i have notes on the rhythm I can dig up. i know that when we worked on it, he initially showed the dununba doing both upbeat and downbeat shuffles but then later corrected it to be completey upbeat/offtime.

Dusu is a nickname for ...it's on the tip of my tongue... :p
hi Dugafola,
yes, i did. I don't remember the nickname. I am writing from memory so... :)
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By tanamasi
#13940
hey dugufola,
as you know, MK's house is at the other side of the street :)

i checked my transcription of the basic pattern of the dundunba for dusu (as opposed to a variation involving the sangban and the dununba) and it is off-beat. the variation is a little bit mixed.
cheers