Discuss drumming technique here
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By Waraba
#28064
Thank you for the freestyle. Can you film something with accompaniment behind you, too?
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By rachelnguyen
#28071
Hi TNT,

I took piano for a couple of years and the drum rudiments you are talking about remind me of the scales I used to practice all the time. It was a way of training my hands to just 'know' certain combinations and movements, depending on what key you are in.

Your comment about the role of dundun caught my eye. Yes, indeed, the dunduns generally play fixed patterns. There is often one or two djembes also playing fixed patterns. In Mali, there might be as many as 5 drums playing patterns and one soloist. However, with Malian groups, the solo gets passed around, often. (Sort of like a jazz group, I think, where each instrument gets their turn.) Some dundun are more for soloing. The Jeli dundun, for example, is a solo instrument. What is amazing about a full compliment of west african drums is that they are all playing completely different patterns, often with bells, which means you have upwards of 8 rhythm patterns creating an incredibly complex piece of music, with a soloist going on top of it.

You talked about the bass drum being able to go independently from the other drums in a kit. I play what is called ballet style dundun, which means I am playing a kenkeni and a dununba together. For the vast majority of the pieces I play, the kenkeni acts as the time keeper. I have never yet learned to have one hand act independent of the other.... so I have to learn the whole pattern as a single thing, with the right and left hand parts intertwining. I know that is NOT how the Malians do it. They learn the right hand and left hand independantly. Is there some exercise to help me learn to do this?

Thanks for sharing the video!

Rachel
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By Waraba
#28084
I didn't mean anything specific-- I was interested in a solo from the heart, a "djembekan," so to speak, that builds and develops a theme. Doesn't even need an audible rhythm outside of itself.
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By Waraba
#28199
TNT wrote:Here is one messing around outside my RV taken with my phone didn't turn out that great, I was hoping to take more but it started raining and I have yet to see if my electronics still works. I tried double and single paradiddles broken out to my bell and wood blocks and it was too difficult so as soon as can do that like I want it I'll try again.

I go from mallets, to shakers, to hands, using mainly single stokes, flams, and drags......You can see my left hand is the weaker so the rudiments help control it. I got a long ways to go but I like were I'm heading. :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AArr20An ... e=youtu.be

OK, man, so I liked that for its musicality and meditative-inducement qualities. It was good music. I felt the spirit and the soul. Now that you can do THAT, which I repeat was very good, are you interested in expanding your ability to speak on the djembe? It's ok with me if not, your music won't suffer if you don't, it is and will remain accomplished; I am only curious.
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By nkolisnyk
#28200
Here is one messing around outside my RV
Man it would have been funny camping beside you last weekend. Atleast there wouldn't be any bears coming around!

Sounds cool man. Keep trying to google Malinke music. If you're into drumming, I bet it will blow your mind.
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By rachelnguyen
#28207
I just came across a video of my teacher playing to some house music recently. I am on the dundun. What I like about this video is that you can get a real sense of how traditional djembe can adapt to a completely different musical tradition. You also get a sense of the amazing range of sounds a great drummer can coax out of his drum. The drum has a cowskin head, tuned very high. I am playing a traditional rhythm to the house music. As dundun, I am laying down the backbone. (this is a ballet version of Dansa.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuKC-GFo ... ata_player