CDs, books and DVDs
By flamba
#36000
First glance, this seems to be a well-structured book with quite some information and will be essential if you go for the exam.

What counts will be practice and a good teacher. The book will only come to life with those. The book will also not transfer the right 'swing', so you will need Mamady's CD's too.
By the way, your teacher may not always follow this book as it is written.

Anyway I will be fun to practice and if you go for the exam I wish you good luck.

flamba
By Djembe04
#36292
In the book "My Life for the Djembe" are many rhythms.
But currently there is no book two of this TTMDA curriculum.
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By korman
#36400
Hi all!

My impressions - the book is nicely done with maps and photographs. However, I have also the older out-of-print book "A life for the djembe", and all the rhythms of this book are there, except Fe 1. Rhythm descriptions are exactly the same in both books. I much prefer the notation system that the old book used to the box system in the new book.

Whereas the old book was simply a reference tome of 60 rhythms, the new thing here is the reference to the new TTMDA curriculum, so this book is meant to support TTMDA level assessement system. The last chapter contains tables that group rhythms in levels, suggests the study sequence and gives a few pointers.

The system tries to structure the traditional rhythms in order of difficulty. Not an easy task for sure, but I cannot see the logic sometimes. Just some examples: Djole is put in dunun level one, but the completely off-beat kenkeni part is in reality far from total beginner's ability; Garangedon is the first ternary rhythm in the dunun level 1, although I think Tiriba (level 3) is much simpler.
By Djembe04
#36401
The system tries to structure the traditional rhythms in order of difficulty. Not an easy task for sure, but I cannot see the logic sometimes. Just some examples: Djole is put in dunun level one, but the completely off-beat kenkeni part is in reality far from total beginner's ability; Garangedon is the first ternary rhythm in the dunun level 1, although I think Tiriba (level 3) is much simpler.
I totally agree

This is partly because MK uses some solo accompaniments instead of the ''normal'' accomp.
I don't understand why. Almost all basic djembe accomp. are the same.

Another example of two other rhythms (that aren't in the book because higher levels):
I think Dunungbe is much harder than Konowulen (1), According to the system it's not.
By davidognomo
#36447
maybe the criterium isn't difficulty. I mean, of course it is, but, maybe it is more important to learn dunungbé first in order to understand the family of rhythms, even if konowoulen is simpler. What kind of preparation does the konowoulen sangban gives that may prepare to the rest of the dunumba rhythms? Maybe some rhythms that are more difficult than others are put in earlier levels in order to prepare for some fundamental aspects in execution, or rhythmic perception, wich will be useful to grasp the others to come. I don't know