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Djembefola - Djembe Forum •Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp
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Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 6:59 am
by JSB
Hi all,

I'm glad to announce that Sega Sidibe recordings will progressively be available for download (and CD for some of them) on Bandcamp.
For the moment, You can find his latest release "Ni nan ko & Bè ta do" produced by PXPrecords.
https://pxprecords.bandcamp.com/album/ni-nan-ko-b-ta-do

The recordings will be organized by label, for practical reasons, but don't be mistaken, buying Sega's music from Bandcamp is the garantee that the money will go to the artist.

These recordings will include some old ones that are now sold out (and that can reach a silly price on the internet) like "Wasulun fenkorow" or not sold at all like "Rythmes du Mali".

There will also be some surprises, like in Sega's playing!

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 8:42 am
by foxleg
Awesome. Looking forward to more releases! :D

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 12:02 am
by JSB
Not sure that this video has already been posted on the forum.
This was filmed during the recording sessions of the album.
[video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Jf0iV9TmAA[/video]

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 1:52 pm
by JSB
Here's the second album from PXPrecords, Njaga, released in 2007:
A music that breathes, served by a minimal orchestration (two djembes and one dunun), the best occasion (especially for a djembefola!) to appreciate the subtleties, the smartness and mischievousness of Sega's playing.

https://pxprecords.bandcamp.com/album/njaga

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 7:16 am
by jahbuyaka
purchased Njaga today. fantastic!!! what is the significance/meaning of the title "Njaga"?

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:36 am
by JSB
I'm glad you enjoy it!

In the past, all the cultural events such as baptisms, weddings, and harvest times were called "Njaga", which simply means "celebration".

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 12:07 pm
by djembefeeling
Jean Sebastian,

I am still curious: what is it in his playing that you appreciate that much? You see him as a master of Malian djembe playing beyond others, and I still do not get why. I listenend again to recordings and youtube videos, but I miss something there that I can find in Drissa Kone, Sega Cisse, Sedu Balo and others. Please give me a hint what it is that I have to reevaluate...

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 8:18 pm
by JSB
We have the same recordings.
I like them very much, you don't like them as much as I do, I don't see anything to reevaluate.
Even if I wanted to, what could I say to convince you if the music doesn't?

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 8:27 pm
by foxleg
thanks for making 'Njaga' available.... I can hear him smiling while he plays.... great stuff....

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:32 am
by JSB
Wasulun fenkorow is finally available for download.

https://segasidibe.bandcamp.com/album/wasulun-fenkorow

Description from the Bandcamp page:
"Wasulun fenkorow" (ancient things from the Wassoulou) is a unique recording, gathering rhythms and songs from Sega Sidibe's native folklore - the highly regarded wasulunke musical tradition. Although some of these rhythms are quite famous and still popular, like Didadi (track #5), N'grinba (aka Wassolonka) and the rhythm accompanying the Sogoninkun mask, the others are rarely played nowadays.
All can be heard in their most traditional and genuine form.
Enjoy these treasures from the past!

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Sun Feb 15, 2015 8:19 am
by bubudi
awesome! wasulun fenkerow is still a personal favourite after so many years! to answer the question about what makes sega's playing so unique, i guess the others mentioned are more similar in their styles. if you spent a lot of time studying their style you may be more partial to it than other styles. in my opinion sega is the quintessential african master musician who is all about feeling and mood, and would prefer to laugh and joke rather than explain or compete with other players. he grew up and played in the village but at the same time developed a rounded style that is decidedly ballet influenced, too. best of both worlds i think. each to their own. i also have huge respect for drissa kone, ibrahima sarr and others.

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:31 am
by djembefeeling
bubudi wrote:in my opinion sega is the quintessential african master musician who is all about feeling and mood, and would prefer to laugh and joke rather than explain or compete with other players. he grew up and played in the village but at the same time developed a rounded style that is decidedly ballet influenced, too. best of both worlds i think.
thanks for that! that gives me some food for thought. I do not often think about matters of taste as being fixed, but as full of potential for development. When I started with drumming, I couldn't listen to recordings with djembe. I thought they are awful to listen to, you have to actively drum in order to like the music, not passively listening to it -- at least you have to listen to live music. But then it was clear that it is a necessary process to listen a lot to the music in order to understand it. So I made myself listening to djembe music only for one year. After that I really liked it.

The same happened with dundunba music. The CD Hamana from MK wasn't music to me. But a girl who played the best in my community said to me I have to able to play that kind of stuff in order to join her band. so I listened a lot. it's still not my favorite album, but dundunbas grew on me.

then again, when I joined Rainer Polaks masterclass, I was sometimes puzzled about his aesthetic judgements. while I prefered soloists who make a lot of things with their drum and roll a lot, he prefered other things. With time, my own aesthetic preferences shifted much in that direction. I am still lacking the high esteem for the style of Yamadou "Bani" Doumbia, but I guess with time and more experience I will at least come to see his point. After all, I came to appreciate the old style of old Namory Keita very much.

that's why I ask. the joke and no competition thing is probably not something that turns me to Sega, since I see that Drissa Koné is much like that. I have not the slightest idea how Séga was in his youth, but with age the competitiveness fades away in most of the masters, though I think it is deeply ingrained into the fabric of the culture (fadenya) and part of the reason why drummers become so good. As to the village style, I cannot say what that really sounds like in that part of Mali.
JSB wrote:Even if I wanted to, what could I say to convince you if the music doesn't?
Well, here you did just that:
What struck me in Sega's playing is the same thing I love in Ahmad Jamal's music, a sense of space, elegance, minimalism and sharpness.
It took me a few seconds to get back to the djembe, while listening to the Madan track of "Rythmes du Mali" (reissued in "Njaga") and it never left me until now.
A sense of space, elegance, minimalism and sharpness is good food for thought and development. The Madan by Sega is something I like pretty much, too. But usually, the minimalism in soloing is something I can appreciate much better in ensemble music of Guinea, where the groove is already a dense texture of different bells, dunduns, and djembes. With one kononi playing practically without variation and one accompaniment, that minimalism appears to be a bit sterile.

in comparism, the minimalism of other old players seems to be of a different kind. it is a continous playing, but with minimal rolling and other "special effects". What they use is an extensive variation in microtiming in order to induce suspense. it is a bit like being on a beach and listening to the continous sounds of the waves that suck you into their realm. it is more dialogic to me, it's like a conversation with the accompanying drums and with itself at the same time, creating archs of suspense like good novels do.

I hope it doesn't bother you. Sometimes, it is hard,not to be misunderstood in writing. I don't want to bash Séga, I really don't. I just try to understand and learn. Will build a konkoni today and listen to some more recordings...

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 6:06 am
by JSB
It's now possible to purchase Cyril Piquet's learning method "SEGA KAN DO" on Bandcamp:
https://segakando.bandcamp.com/merch/se ... ing-method

The full ensemble Audio tracks (drums and songs) are also available as a standalone digital album:
https://segakando.bandcamp.com/releases

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Sun May 31, 2015 8:16 pm
by JSB
The first album of Sega, recorded in 1998 in Bamako, is now available for download here:
https://segasidibe.bandcamp.com/album/rythmes-du-mali

It was the third CD of a series published by an organization called Bagolo Fo, created by a french student of Sega Sidibe, the two other CDs consisting of an audio method.

Since this time, two tutorial books with DVD and or CD covering Sega's teaching were published, and that's why I didn't release these 2 tutorial CDs.

Re: Sega Sidibe on Bandcamp

Posted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 8:40 am
by djembefeeling
Thanks for that! I never heard about this one. I will soon download that one from the link you provided.

You say it is his first CD. But didn't Gerhard Kero produce a CD as early as 1991 with Sega?