Advice and questions on making and fixing instruments
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By korman
#39260
Yesterday I tried to make a kensedeni using a plastic pipe and a bongo skin, but the hide is too stiff (or too thick?). I get acceptable tone when striking with finger, however, with a stick there's an unpleasant click upon impact which completely destroys the tone. Probably I should get a thinner hide, but maybe there is a way to soften the cowhide I've already put on?
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By Dugafola
#39261
best bet is to play it. or put something like shea butter on it and play it. or just take it off and start over with a better skin.
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By boromir76
#39271
Like Dugafola said, the skin has to be played and it will soften up because of that gradually. I had similar issue when puting new thick cow skins on dunduns. Thick skin is quite hard and has a somewhat plastic like surface and sound, when being hit with stick on the beginning. This clicky sound will disapear 100% with enough playing.
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By Dugafola
#39272
there's a misconception that thick cow skins are great for dununba drums. the goal is to produce sound. those super thick skins just do not vibrate enough to produce a nice deep loud sound....unless it's been really played in....years. a nice medium thick cow skin consistent side to side is the best bet for dununba IMO. you can go heavier on sangban and kenkeni....that's a great sound.
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By boromir76
#39273
Dugafola wrote:
Sun Dec 16, 2018 4:26 pm
there's a misconception that thick cow skins are great for dununba drums. the goal is to produce sound. those super thick skins just do not vibrate enough to produce a nice deep loud sound....unless it's been really played in....years. a nice medium thick cow skin consistent side to side is the best bet for dununba IMO. you can go heavier on sangban and kenkeni....that's a great sound.
It depends on what you consider as super thick cow skins...but yes, thick skins sound probably better on sangban and kenkeni, than on dununba... I would not go as far to say that they sound bad on dununba, but they are somewhat more demanding to play, especially when playing traditionally: need more punching force to sound enough loud.
Last edited by boromir76 on Sun Dec 16, 2018 5:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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By Dugafola
#39274
oh yea much more energy and force required. forgot to mention that.