Just for giggles
By djembeweaver
#28803
I had the weirdest text exchange yesterday. I am still totally mystified so here's the transcritpion (I call the texter 'X' since I have no idea who they are):

X: Hi Jon. What sheepskin do you use as I am allergic to New Zealand Temuka sheep?

Me: I use west african goat skin so should be ok.

X: Do you happen to know the goat's family tree?Just in case its ancestors originate from Temuka. Many thanks.

Me: Standard west african goat skins. I don't know any more than that. They are usually preshaved and I don't know of anybody who's ever been allergic to them. Is this about fixing a drum or coming to a drum class? At the class I can even bring one with a plastic skin.

X: Sorry I thought this was Ali's Spice House. I ordered extra goat curry!

Me: Really? I run drum classes and skin drums with goat skins! But if you were ordering a curry how did you know my name?

X: If you do a goat and fried pineapple that would be great also.

WTF????????
User avatar
By michi
#28805
Wow! That's really some exchange! :lol:

Maybe there's another lesson the djembe has to teach in there somewhere? ;)

By sounds of things, the person was asking about a curry spice mix that might contain sheepskin. Maybe there is such a thing… My searches didn't find anything. But, if there were a curry that contains sheepskin, I'd be the first to try :)

(One of my hobbies is eating any food that I can get hold of, no matter how weird, at least once. So far, my collection includes cat, termites, jelly fish, ants, durian, civet coffee, whale (only once), snake, dog, rat, plus any innard you can name. Still to collect: Witchety grubs and Funa Zushi. Life is too short…)

Michi.
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By rachelnguyen
#28806
Djembeweaver, someone was putting you on. Their first question was about sheep skin. I don't believe that has anything to do with goat curry. The only other thing I can think of is the dreaded autocorrect. Maybe sheepskin was actually something else.

In any case, it ranks as one of the weirdest texts ever. You do, of course, have the guy's phone number, so if you are feeling adventurous you can just call and see whazup.

Keep us posted, LOL.

LOL, Michi, that is some list! I would eat a wriggling live witchety grub before I would touch funa zushi. Eating em toasted would be a piece of cake.
User avatar
By michi
#28812
rachelnguyen wrote:LOL, Michi, that is some list! I would eat a wriggling live witchety grub before I would touch funa zushi. Eating em toasted would be a piece of cake.
Rachel, I like your attitude! We need to go out and have dinner somewhere exotic! ;-)

Michi.
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By rachelnguyen
#28816
Vietnam! :-)

Truthfully, my palate is pretty western, so Asian cuisine has the most potential to weird me out. Don't get me wrong, I love the stuff, but it took me some time to develop the love of some of the more, shall we say, exotic tastes and textures. I like your list of strange foods, by the way. I haven't had nearly as many as you. My list so far:

jellyfish, snails and various other types of sea creatures. (I live on a coast, after all.)
some weird creature in Vietnam that was probably some sort of rodent. (We got it cooked in a sauce and no one could tell us what it actually was. It was tough and dry and mostly bland.)
seal (disgusting. tastes like rotting fish. As opposed to vietnamese fish sauce, which actually IS made from rotting fish and is indescribably delicious when used properly. We saw where it was made when we were there. Could smell the vats miles away, LOL)
turr (a type of seabird that is also disgusting. That's why I know the extremely fishy stuff ain't for me.)
moose- utterly delicious
deer ""
various parts of things- head cheese, scrapple, etc.
tripe of various types
alligator (tastes like chicken, LOL.)
One of my favorite dishes of all time is vietnamese. I had an eel cake wrapped in caul fat from a cow. Holy Eel and Cow, batman. DELICIOUS.

I'd say when we get the chance, we should definitely have dinner!
User avatar
By michi
#28820
rachelnguyen wrote:Vietnam! :-)
I'll eat that any day! :)
I'd say when we get the chance, we should definitely have dinner!
Don't know when I'll next be in your area. Will let you know if it happens though, promise! :)

Michi.
User avatar
By michi
#28825
the kid wrote:I'm gonna bet you wouldn't eat Donkey Sausage
Sorry, in the bag already. As a matter of fact, for more than forty years. You haven't lived unless you've eaten Gavrilovic salami made in the former Yugoslavia. That company has been making salami for over 300 years, and is probably single-handedly responsible for the world not being overrun by donkeys…

Michi.
By djembeweaver
#28827
Update: tried calling the number 3 or 4 times and no answer. I think Rachel's right and it was a wind up by someone with a strange sense of humour.

I ate insects in Guinea. Don't know what they were called but the kids ate them like sweets (they were in fact very sweet).

Personally I'd rather eat donkey salami than fufu. God I loath that stuff.
User avatar
By rachelnguyen
#28833
i haven't eaten horse or donkey, but I am guessing it is delicious. Most big lumbering herbivores are pretty tasty.

djembeweaver, maybe it really was an accidental call, then. What a strange happenstance that he or she landed on someone that actually deals with goatskins!
User avatar
By michi
#28835
djembeweaver wrote:I ate insects in Guinea. Don't know what they were called but the kids ate them like sweets (they were in fact very sweet).
Wow, I'd love to try that!
Personally I'd rather eat donkey salami than fufu. God I loath that stuff.
Fufu and banku were among my favourite staples in Ghana. The doughy and slightly sour taste really grew on me while I was there. But, yes, it takes a little while to get used to the texture.

Another thing I loved in Ghana was something that looked a lot like chopped English spinach, but actually was made from potato leaves. Yum!

Cheers,

Michi.
By bubudi
#28840
that's a funny conversation. i can't see the relationship of sheepskin to curry. gotta be a prank!

cassava and potato leaves are my favourite and i am quite fond of fufu myself. gari and kenda are west african foods that most westerners have trouble adapting to. gari is fermented cassava meal and kenda (also known as sumbala in maninka) is another fermented product coming from the seeds of a tree.
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By michi
#28852
bubudi wrote:that's a funny conversation.
Well, this is the Humour forum! :)
i can't see the relationship of sheepskin to curry.
Well, people use all sorts of whacko ingredients. (Rhino horn, anyone? :( )
gotta be a prank!
Yes, I'd say so. Quite a good one, actually :)
gari is fermented cassava meal and kenda (also known as sumbala in maninka) is another fermented product coming from the seeds of a tree.
I've had gari, but not kenda. Another one for the list… :)

Cheers,

Michi.
By bubudi
#28858
michi wrote:
I've had gari, but not kenda. Another one for the list… :)
that reminds me of a krio proverb: ogiri de laf kenda fo smehl (ogiri is laughing at kenda for smelling, or in other words, the pot calling the kettle black!). as you may have guessed, ogiri is yet another fermented product, this time coming from the egusi melon seed. another one for the list? :)