Just for giggles
#23908
I can't believe that last year at this time I was cluelessly rocking a sweet brown fiberglass Remo. My daughter calls me a djembe snob, but we all have real wood/goat skin/rope djembes. Oh what a difference a year makes.
#28792
I know its an old thread but had to through down my 2 cents. Remo djembes are actually constructed of a material called acousticon. They teamed up w/ 3M to turn recycled cardboard into an acoustical material appropriate for hand drums. I think they sound better than other factory djembes that are made of plastic and really do sound sterile. As a drum circle facilitator I love to have a certain number of remos in the circle because when their harmonic frequencies (ringing) combine with the other sounds of the group in the right environment, it sounds like a choir of angels. You have to hear it to appreciate how cool it is! Also, they do sound less ringey when they are tuned up. See http://remo.com/portal/artists/4384/Leon_Mobley.html
fast forward to 3 minute mark to avoid the commercial but tuned up and played with good technique they sound pretty darn good. All that said I prefer to play a wood and skin djembe from Guinea tuned supertight myself.
#28794
Hey OshKosh, welcome to the forum! I will agree that the remo sounds better than the plastic toca any day. But I have to say, I used to take a class with a remo player and it was absolutely awful. Her drum had so many ringy overtones it actually got confusing for the other students. My friend ended up buying a nice goatskinned drum from Mali and never looked back!

I realize that drum circles are a different situation, since everyone is playing different stuff. I suppose it makes sense that different sounds would work well in that case.

In any case, it is great to have you aboard and hope to hear more from you!

Rachel
#28802
I just had a listen. I have to admit that this particular one sounded better than many other Remos I've heard. But still, I'm unimpressed by the sound. It's sort of one-dimensional. There are clear tones and slaps, but the overtones you get from a traditional djembe are missing. Also, the plastic skin just sounds harsh. Especially tones are not nice and dark, but have this plasticky attack sound that makes them too bright.

It would be interesting to hear one of those drums with a goat skin on it. Given that I still believe that 70% (well, 50%, after Carl bargained me down ;) ) of the sound of the drum is the skin, it may be that, with a goat skin, a Remo could sound decent, if not brilliant.

Have to wait for someone to rock up with a Remo for reskinning, so I can sell them on fitting a goat skin to it :)

Michi.
#28808
That really would be an interesting experiment. But the plastic tocas have goat skin and still sound terrible... so I am not sure it is going to make that much difference. Of course, the tocas use craptastic processed skins from Pakistan, not african (or aussie) goatskins.

Somebody out there must have a remo they want to reskin, LOL. Let's try it!
#28814
rachelnguyen wrote:That really would be an interesting experiment. But the plastic tocas have goat skin and still sound terrible... so I am not sure it is going to make that much difference. Of course, the tocas use craptastic processed skins from Pakistan, not african (or aussie) goatskins.
I recently repaired a rope-tuned Toca that someone brought me. It was a wooden one though, not plastic. Very cheaply made Indonesion djembe, with a Toca logo. After I was done with it, it sounded OK, but not great. Basically, just like what you would a cheap Indonesian copy to sound like. With a plastic shell instead, I would expect the exact same thing to sound worse, even with an African skin.
Somebody out there must have a remo they want to reskin, LOL. Let's try it!
I'll do it first chance I get. But, most likely, a Remo owner will go to a music shop and buy the original spare part and replace it themselves rather than coming to me, so we might have to wait a long time…

Michi.
#29039
Yay, I just got a call, the guy is bringing me a REMO Klong Yaw that he doesn't like the sound of so he wants to put goat on it. Interesting that this happens within weeks of our conversation here. Anyway I will try and document w/ video and post to utube and link here, hopefully we can see some good difference.

Rhythmically,
Robin C.
#29872
OK, I got it done, it doesn't sound as good as I thought it might, but the head is still young (2 days) so I haven't tuned it very tight either. Unfortunately, I am giving it back to the customer tonight. If he wants it tuned higher I'll have him bring it back and I'll try and get a better way to record it by then. For now , though,

you can see a vid from my iPhone on youtube here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsqxO3Un ... e=youtu.be

See a photo here:

http://www.oshkoshrhythm.com/klongyaw
#29875
oshkoshrhythm wrote:OK, I got it done, it doesn't sound as good as I thought it might, but the head is still young (2 days) so I haven't tuned it very tight either. Unfortunately, I am giving it back to the customer tonight. If he wants it tuned higher I'll have him bring it back and I'll try and get a better way to record it by then. For now , though,

you can see a vid from my iPhone on youtube here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsqxO3Un ... e=youtu.be

See a photo here:

http://www.oshkoshrhythm.com/klongyaw
You know, I think you did a really good job on that. You changed so much--the rope work, the ring (the physical metal ring, not the sound), the skin, the only thing that's different from a real djembe is the shell now. The wacky, crazy shell. At first I thought it actually was a wooden shell. It sounds like my low-tuned Mali shell. But this goes to show just how much difference workmanship and skin can make. We should ask not, "is it a djembe," but, "Is it still a Remo?"