Post links to uploaded videos or you tube and lets discuss them.
By bubudi
#4282
thanks, the second video is the best. except the bit where he says 'soboninkun c'est la cours des cheveaux'. if he doesn't know it, he shouldn't tell it. i also noticed that his students (3rd video) all have an obvious lack of technique and he was not doing anything to correct them.
By Paul
#4289
Do you go straight into teaching techique in a class of beginners?

Personally i do a little and see if they stick around a bit.
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By bops
#4301
:shock: :shock: :shock: Thanks for posting! :djembe: dang....

I like the second video best too. Incredible feeling in his playing. A lot of guys can't do that, all they do is rip fast.

I think this is great stuff for someone who's trying to learn jembe rudiments. Just learn his ghosting parts.
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By bops
#4304
bubudi, it sounded like he said sobolikan... which may be the same as soboninkun, they sound alike. Maybe not, though - I don't know.

Famoudou once taught a rhythm called Turuba, which felt similar to Tiriba. He explained that even though they sound alike, there's a completely different background to the rhythm. :?:
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By bops
#4308
bubudi wrote:farming rhythm?
No, he said Turu is the name for a womens' hairstyle that's no longer very common. The song was for women to show off their Turu. Not sure why they would have named a rhythm after a hairstyle, but that's what he said...
By bubudi
#4313
i think for the guineans a new hairstyle is a pretty good reason to invent a new dance :mrgreen:
i'd say though that the rhythm would have been forgotten had famoudou not dug it out.
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By newworlddrumming
#4322
When you guys talk about 'feeling' in playing, I think you are referring to the shuffle pattern that is rhythmically not quite eighth note or triplet based, but somewhere in between. Am I mistaken?
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By e2c
#4325
bubudi wrote:i think for the guineans a new hairstyle is a pretty good reason to invent a new dance :mrgreen:
Agreed, bubudi! :) I wish American music was more like this - people making up songs and dances about everyday things, like what it's like to have a really tasty lunch, or things that you think about when you're putting out the trash (garbage, "dust") or looking at the sky or a bird or tree. (I've been thinking this way since I was a kid - why are all the songs on the radio about love, anyway?!~ guess my opinion hasn't changed much since then. ;))
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By e2c
#4326
newworlddrumming wrote:When you guys talk about 'feeling' in playing, I think you are referring to the shuffle pattern that is rhythmically not quite eighth note or triplet based, but somewhere in between. Am I mistaken?
OK... I'm a gal, but I'll weigh in anyway. ;)

If you're picking up on a certain "swing" to his playing, then probably yes. But it's *not* "swing" in the sense that the word is used in jazz, and it's not really a shuffle, either (as you said). I'm not good at theory/analysis, but even if I was, I wouldn't want to put it in those terms - because time is much more elastic in this music than it is in most Western music.

So yeah, I think you're hitting on at least part of it - but it's also to do with the fact (IMO) that Outtara is a very melodic player, especially in that 2nd video. You can hear the basic patterns and then a series of improvs and riffs on those patterns - as melodic phrases. it would nice to be able to hear and see a vid with an ensemble and soloist (though computer speakers would probably not be able to pick up all of the different drum/bell parts...)

One last thought: Outtara knows what *not* to play - he leaves some space in the music where others might just hammer away, as bops said. I like that! :)
Last edited by e2c on Tue May 12, 2009 5:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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By the kid
#4332
e2c wrote:
bubudi wrote:i think for the guineans a new hairstyle is a pretty good reason to invent a new dance :mrgreen:
Agreed, bubudi! :) I wish American music was more like this -
I'm sure there is some country music about mullet hair cuts???
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By e2c
#4339
KEANIEirishdjembe wrote:
e2c wrote:
bubudi wrote:i think for the guineans a new hairstyle is a pretty good reason to invent a new dance :mrgreen:
Agreed, bubudi! :) I wish American music was more like this -
I'm sure there is some country music about mullet hair cuts???
Oh, probably - d'ye really think I'd be interested in those songs, though?! ;)
By martin73
#4341
i also noticed that his students (3rd video) all have an obvious lack of technique and he was not doing anything to correct them.
Do you go straight into teaching techique in a class of beginners?

Personally i do a little and see if they stick around a bit.
But did you see the one guy with the djembe pointing the wrong way? Technique is one thing, I'm not sure how he could let the guy get away with that...it looks painful to me.
By bubudi
#4343
KEANIEirishdjembe wrote:I'm sure there is some country music about mullet hair cuts???
it would be cool to create a rhythm for that. call it djekunsifoli (fish hairdo rhythm). any takers?