For chatting and discussions.
#38295
Paul wrote: While I havent played any of the US based drum company drums the standard pricing is much lower Europe. For 400euro I expect top of the line here.
Hey Paul can you share some examples of top of line in Europe at 400 euros? Id be interested in comparing them. Are they apples to apples with Wula, drunskulls etc..? I am just not famiar with what is available in Europe
#38298
I always thought about ordering from baragnouma. But then one student of mine wanted to safe 50,-€ and ordered a kamelen ngoni from them. What an awful sound that instrument had, ughh! Don't know if that transfers on djembe, but my trust is gone.

Because of the heavy deforestation I am thinking about going local and change to djembes made out of sustainable local wood like maple...
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By the kid
#38301
I have a Baragoma drum. Didn't really want it but friend wanted to sell it. XL bowl djalla, . I put the thickest Goat skin i ever saw on it and it warped when it was cranked. Thick spine, i though it should take the pressure but it didn't. It is not a classy djembe, haven't found the sound so good but need to put another skin on it, and was thinking cow might work out better than goat sound wise, and would be an even pressure so to not extenuate the warp. The weight is light approx 8 kg and therein lies the problem imo. The carve is too tidy limiting the strenght of the shell. Needed more wood for support and sound. I'd still be interested in some of the iron wood drums from them or the balas but hearing DF's review of the ngoni i'd be weary.
#38306
the barougnouma drum i have seen and played was nice, but way too heavy! it had to be 30lbs at least.

it sounded good...i think it was gele. but i wasn't into the shape of it at all either.
By Paul
#38318
I've just bought a shell a lenke from djembe webshop. The shell looks good but the rings were the wrong size. The guy said if i was a 'real' (he actually but it quotes) drum maker i would be able to make my own. Oh dear..

I was actually living in the bar''ag##no##uma factory while i was in burkina in 2006. Their prices have hopped from 200-400e overnight. I would say this is led by US demand, various European dealers now quote in Dollars, which kinda says everything.
I'm surprised to hear they aren't good though. Obviusly i heard some whilst there played by some good djembefolas mind.
djembefeeling wrote:ordered a kamelen ngoni from them. What an awful sound that instrument had, ughh!


I had someone say that my ngoni were too expensive (350e max) and they would buy them there. I generally will resit a bridge or change a string for free if people buy from me, but i show no love if they shop elsewhere. I geenreally will play in a ngoni a good bit, as its a real pain at the start with the constant tuning. The videos sound good, so i dont know whats the problem there.
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By the kid
#38322
I'm pretty sure the rope is totally unnecessary and is all for the aesthetic appeal. I like it, and would expect such craftsmanship for the amount listed in the title.

It is pretty unique and original rope work in fairness. Well thought out color schemes and designs.

It is nice to see some arty stuff using the already nice shape of the djembe.
#38323
the Italian stuff looks nice, but have you looked up the weight? over 15 kg for the one I looked up...

as to baragnouma ngonis, the clips on youtube sound nice, but that's the problem about sound clips, it can sound really different to what it sounds next to you. the craftswork was all fine, but the sound terrible. partly this was a result of cheap strings, I think, but you couldn't change the strings and expect it to be good. what those guys in Africa don't know is the much different climatic envirenment we live in here. if there is not enough tension on the skin, in our humid conditions such an instrument sounds awful, but can sound ok in the heat of Africa. If I can be a little snotty I'd say the all sound poor next to the stuff I make ;)
Paul wrote:I had someone say that my ngoni were too expensive (350e max) and they would buy them there. I generally will resit a bridge or change a string for free if people buy from me, but i show no love if they shop elsewhere.
right! the cheap guy who bought the terrible ngoni from baragnouma asked me tons of questions and wanted me to re-string and stuff. I just said please contact your dealer for any problems with your instrument...

as to webshop, that guy just delivered drums and stuff directly home to my place. it was the first time I ordered and we met. I can only say about him that I really like that guy, honest as it gets. he lives for traditional african djembe music and has very small margines of profit from what he sells. he is doing a lot labour for the love of the music. that's why stuff there is really cheap. he brought me a wula drum, too, to compare, but I liked his stuff better in terms of sound. but the wula had a white skin and probably had so much wet pull that it was almost dead. also, it had some varnish on it which I don't like at all. the foot was enormous, too big for any of my bags.

astonishingly, I liked the sound of one of his sustainable maple wood djembes the most. very balanced sounds i.e. slaps, tones, and basses were all nice and about the same level. a student of mine who also teaches immediately took that today. :afro:

about the rings, it's common nowadays in Africa to do them extremely tight. you can see that on djembes where the knots have left deep marks in the wood. they do that because the wood is usually not decently stored to dry and usually will loose some diameter in the aftermath. we had the problem earlier that the rings were too big after that. so today they do them really tight, so the big rings problem for later is not as bad or even vanished.

due to his little margins, lots of work, and plenty of grumpy costumers he can be a bit rude at times. but that's not his habit, I can assure you. did you check out his offer of a bundle of melina djembes? really nice sound and you get 5 for 625,-€. that's ridiculous, man! and that melina grows fast in plantations, so does not contribute to deforestation. what a deal...
#38328
Paul wrote: I bought 5 of the melina, they are very very good.
Right. That stuff is so good, I wish I could have had that from the beginning for my students. They sound really good. I mean when you compare the hardwood or the maple with them, you will notice a difference in quality, the sound is not as full and dynamic. But still very good. And the weight is much more comfortable. I don't know any other place where you can get such quality for less than 150,- € for a piece. How is he even doing that? I mean the stuff is built in Guinea, it has to be harvested, shaped, iron rings are welded and qualit skins mounted and transported to Europe, they have to be stored and advertised, taken care of and shipped again. A 125,-€ a piece in the bundle is hard to comprehend, it still puzzles me...
By Paul
#38330
korman wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:43 pm
boromir76 wrote:
Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:12 pm
This Italian web store has some interesting rope system solutions. Some djembes are very colourful and litlle over the top for my taste... No english version of site and no prices unfortunately.
http://www.furiafudjembe.it/strumenti-i ... n-vendita/
Hmm, interesting. I wonder is there any point beyond fancy look, though.
Yikes, i wouldnt be into that now. Also by lengthening the ring rope you shorten the verticals which should make it harder to pull.
#38331
djembefeeling wrote:
Thu Oct 05, 2017 2:15 pm
as to webshop, that guy just delivered drums and stuff directly home to my place. it was the first time I ordered and we met. I can only say about him that I really like that guy, honest as it gets. he lives for traditional african djembe music and has very small margines of profit from what he sells. he is doing a lot labour for the love of the music. that's why stuff there is really cheap. he brought me a wula drum, too, to compare, but I liked his stuff better in terms of sound. but the wula had a white skin and probably had so much wet pull that it was almost dead. also, it had some varnish on it which I don't like at all. the foot was enormous, too big for any of my bags.
I buy skin and other suplies from Djembe web shop for some time now and they never disapointed me. By far the best online djembe store in Europe that a I have found untill now, especially when it comes to prices and qualitty.
Djembes made from local non african wood's can be also good if not equally good as the w african ones... My drumming colleauge just made recently one for himself from local (Slovenian) maple and it sounds really nice...
#38414
I have a new student for kamelen ngoni, and he brought his newly aquired instrument from baragnouma. Same story: instrument looks good, some fine craftwork. But awful, dull/muffled sound. Had to put some deent work into the isntrument before it started to sound ok, i.e. change strings and neck.