For chatting and discussions.
By bkidd
#29121
(#4) I've never heard devil drum or anything about devil wood.

(#5) The instructions for producing tones and slaps aren't the way I would describe how to produce these sounds.

(#6) I've never heard of a genie that gifted the knowledge of making drums to the blacksmiths.

(#7, #8, #9) All have problems.

The entire page seems to stretch things a bit. It may be that these "facts" are collected from one person's point of view. I mostly think that it's a problem with calling these facts. Most of them seem like stories.

Best,
-Brian
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By michi
#29127
#10 also has a problem because the term "djembefola" is not reserved only for masters.

#1 is one explanation of the origin of the word djembe. I don't believe that it is universally accepted as the only or definitive explanation.
All ninjas are Mammals
Thanks for that! I just learned something :)

Michi.
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By The Dank
#29136
I disagree with the description of a tone as a "soft, yet full sound" in #5. In my opinion, the tone is the most important of the three sounds, and we should think of it as being equally intense as the slap, even though it doesn't tend to cut through an ensemble as much. In my (limited) experience, many beginners (and even some experts) tend to give the tone short shrift.

But then again, that's just my opinion...
By jahbuyaka
#29141
what about ninja turtles greg? it appears some ninjas might be of reptilian persuasion. :D
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By michi
#29144
The Dank wrote:In my (limited) experience, many beginners (and even some experts) tend to give the tone short shrift.
Listen to Famoudou and his tones. They really make his playing. Big, fat, and penetrating. He doesn't just play fat tones, he also controls the volume and pitch of his slaps. By playing with the dynamics of each, he gets wonderful effects that are so much richer than the endless hammered-out slaps I hear from so many players.

Michi.
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By gr3vans
#29149
jahbuyaka wrote:what about ninja turtles greg? it appears some ninjas might be of reptilian persuasion. :D
:o

FACT: All facts are based on perception, awareness and political motivation. they are also backed by statistics and those are never subjective.


:rofl:
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By The Dank
#29152
Listen to Famoudou and his tones. They really make his playing. Big, fat, and penetrating. He doesn't just play fat tones, he also controls the volume and pitch of his slaps. By playing with the dynamics of each, he gets wonderful effects that are so much richer than the endless hammered-out slaps I hear from so many players.
Exactly. This is why Famoudou is probably my favorite djembe player.

I greatly respect the experts who can do crazy, technical fireworks. In the end, though, it's the players with the best sound that impress me the most.

Cheers,
~D
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By Waraba
#29159
bkidd wrote:(#4) I've never heard devil drum or anything about devil wood.

(#6) I've never heard of a genie that gifted the knowledge of making drums to the blacksmiths.
I've heard two things in relation to #5, both from Abdoul Doumbia: that lenke is "possessed" of an impish spirit, while dugura is a friendly spirit; also, Abdoul Doumbia told me a legend of how the djembe came to the people: a man was walking when he heard another man playing a drum whose sound was marvelous and novel. This was the first djembe, with which the first man became obsessed, and traded his son to the second man for the drum. The second man was the devil, and once he departed with the first man's son, the first man lamented greatly. But he had this awesome drum.

Fode Sissoko, who is from Senegal but lived in New Paltz, NY until recently, told us a very detailed story about a djinn who appeared to a king and gifted him the djembe, plus free lessons (taught him the entire repertoire in a night). The ba-da-bee-dee-ba international accompaniment part was the king's rendition of his wife's name (Fanta Kabila, or something like that--sadly, I forgot).