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By bubudi
#28153
hi daniel & others!
Afoba wrote:thanx to Rainer Polak and his deep researches:
"The square frame drum gunbe originates from the Carribean and has spread along the west african coast since the early 19th century. Departing from Dakar and Abidjan, in the 1930s and especially in the 1950s in relation to the independence movements, the gunbe movement then covered large parts of the inner French West Africa as well."
if you see my thread about jolay (dyole, djole) in the cultural section, you will find some history there. i have had several reliable sources from sierra leone and ghana told me that the gumbay drums and genre were introduced by freed jamaican maroons to freetown. this was later corroborated by three different articles i read on the subject. the frame drum and music had originated in jamaica as a rebellion to the british ban on the use of peg drums, and was strictly recreational.

the african music historian john collins says it was 1st october 1801 that the gumbay drums came to sierra leone. the gumbe music as it developed in sierra leone came to fernando po (now called bioko) in the 1940s via the migrant labour of west africans to do carpentry and other work, among them ghanaians (mainly ga ethnicity from greater accra region) and sierra leoneans (largely krio from freetown). some 500 or so afro-cubans had been sent to fernando po in the 1800s while fernando po was under spanish rule, so it's probably likely that there was some afro-cuban influence on gumbe after the sierra leoneans brought it to the island. the ga then adopted gumbe into their own tradition (they call the rhythm 'gome'), and added octagonal frame drums (as opposed to the rectangular/square ones originally used), to reflect their carpentry skills.

the spread to francophone west africa happened in 3 ways. firstly, from ghana to upper volta (now called burkina faso) and then to cote d'ivoire. secondly, from sierra leone to guinea. thirdly, the spread across anglophone west africa included nigeria and gambia. gambia is very close to senegal, and then from there it spread to mali. the genre also spread to cameroon, gabon and congo. in other words, all over west africa and into central africa.

gumbe gave birth to 3 other popular genres - asiko (originally pronounced ashiko), maringa and milo jazz. the francophones pronounced it assiko, the guineans further shortened that to 'siko'.
By bubudi
#28155
re: michi's statement that epizo said that a small djembe from landouma country was called 'gumbe': in the documentary 'landouma fare' with youssouf koumbassa, there's a bit where they talk about the djembe not being originally part of landouma culture. there were small djembes in susu culture (after all boke is dominated by susu) and they were known as 'sanban' and 'papa', but not gumbe.
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By michi
#28169
Afoba wrote:Michi
Yes, Mamady teaches that Djole was originally played on Siko drums. But that Gunbe is not the one I had in mind. Have a look at the image in this post. That's what Epizo told me is a Gumbe.
I would simply call that a djembé.
Yes and no… Mamady actually mentioned this drum this week. The main difference to a djembe is the shape and the way the skin is fixed. There is no rope. The skin is attached with nails. The giant seke seke on these drums also differ from those for a djembe.
Words and names are interesting but dangerous. "Gunbe" might (just as "sabar"?) describe a situation much more than a drum. The name of the situation can then occasionally be used for drums that are used for it....
Yes, that's my take too. And the spelling issue is treacherous at best, given that none of the djembe countries ever had a written language.
Btw: I would say the form of theses drums is quite similar to the senegalese djembe that someone (sorry, who again?) posted in the other thread some days ago.
Yes, that's why I mentioned the Landouma drum. The Senegal djembe reminded of the Landouma version because of the similar shape.

Cheers,

Michi.
#28170
Hi Bubudi & Michi,
I should make clear that I didn't express myself that well, when saying
I would simply call that a djembé.
I should have said, "I would call that a djembe when talking to you guys or to Maninka drummers."
Of course, djembe is "sanbanyi" in susu. I don't know about other Lower Guinean names. Where do you have "papa" from, Bubudi?
Greets, D
By bubudi
#28172
hi daniel

a few susu djembe players have told me that the smaller djembe is called 'papa'. i have to ask again to find out if that was different to the sanban in older times. i was always told that the rhythm yoki was originally played on bote, bala and papa.
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By gr3vans
#28224
Dugafola wrote:
Afoba wrote: Of course, it would be helpful to have someone here who knows about wolof drumming. He or she might say it's all rubbish and then we could go on with the original subject of the other thread (scusa!).
.
there are some wolof griot drummers that live in my town. i will ask them the next time i see them.
Is Alisco Diabate in your hood? I think he has gumbe on his album. Not sure if he's versed in anything Wolof though.
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By gr3vans
#28225
If that last post was forking the topic away from the frame drum I apologize. I've been looking for information on this rhythm called Goumbe
http://soundcloud.com/gr3vans/gumbe
I understand that it is a region or an ethnic group near (but not in) boke. The rhythm referenced on Aly's CD and in the recording from the link above, is to my understanding a healing dance from that area.
#28230
Just to report that Murat Coskun, the frame drum expert from my area couldn't help me. He doesn't know about frame drums in Westafrica. A pity that he had not much time (he was just organizing a frame drum festival, when I asked him). I might ask him again next time about frame drums in the Carribean, which I totally ignore....
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By Dugafola
#28238
this has nothing to do with the thread really...

but i just spoke with fode camara and asked him about gunbe. he said it's from the Samou area which is southern coastal guinea (south of CKY) and is from the mandenyi ethnic group. same ethnic group where yamama comes from. it's also referred to as touba by the jalonke and landouma up near Boke and is also related to the rhythm warra.
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By gr3vans
#28244
Dugafola wrote:this has nothing to do with the thread really...

but i just spoke with fode camara and asked him about gunbe. he said it's from the Samou area which is southern coastal guinea (south of CKY) and is from the mandenyi ethnic group. same ethnic group where yamama comes from. it's also referred to as touba by the jalonke and landouma up near Boke and is also related to the rhythm warra.
thank you.
By bubudi
#28263
Dugafola wrote:this has nothing to do with the thread really...

but i just spoke with fode camara and asked him about gunbe. he said it's from the Samou area which is southern coastal guinea (south of CKY) and is from the mandenyi ethnic group. same ethnic group where yamama comes from. it's also referred to as touba by the jalonke and landouma up near Boke and is also related to the rhythm warra.
i can confirm that gunbe is played in samu. it's a region that also extends into sierra leone (samu chiefdom) and is dominated by susu and temne and a minority mandenyi (aka bullom) population. if you see my op in the jollay thread, you'll find i mention mandenyi and temne among the groups that took up the gunbe & jole music. this was the route in which the music spread into guinea. therefore i'm not in the least surprised to see that fode c mentions samu as the place of origin. they use the jole masks there too.
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By Dugafola
#39383
i was looking for something else and found this thread.

re: gunbe. i read a scholarly paper about wasulu music that mentioned that gunbe was introduced to west africa in the 1800s to released slaves coming back home from the carribean.

so some of the things mentioned in this thread regarding the frame drum etc. definitely are reinforced by that idea.