For chatting and discussions.
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By Carl
#8293
Paul wrote:My drum is hurting my head
You might try using your hands.... that might be the problem...

:-)

C

PS: Now you understand my logic: 2 guinesses = good morning 2+ guinesses = bad morning.

Ah, to be 23 again.
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By Dugafola
#9575
michi@triodia.com wrote:I just found this issue of World Percussion & Rhythm (linked from Taylor's website). It contains an interview with Taylor where he talks a fair bit about the certification program. The same issue also contains an interview with Mamady. Both are worth reading!

Cheers,

Michi.
there's an error in Taylor's interview. Numou are the blacksmiths that make/carve djembes. Nalu is an ethnic group from coastal Guinea and also where the rhythm Sinte is from.
User avatar
By michi
#9592
Dugafola wrote:there's an error in Taylor's interview. Numou are the blacksmiths that make/carve djembes. Nalu is an ethnic group from coastal Guinea and also where the rhythm Sinte is from.
Yes. Taylor himself mentions this on his Artist's Spotlight page.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By Carl
#9614
TTM comment:

I was just reviewing my recordings from working with Mahiri.

We were discussing Garangadon, a rhythm that I tend to think of as "beginner".

I realized that we worked on the tune for over 20 min, discussing elements of solo style and dunun variations. That's one of the coolest things about working with a mentor. You realize that there are no "easy" tunes. It's all just music, and there is so much to learn about the relationships between the parts and the dance. (Mahiri got stumped at one point because we didn't have a dancer to demonstrate the relationship of the solo to the movement of the bobo!(a piece of clothing))

Anyway, just a cool realization along the path.

C
User avatar
By Dugafola
#9617
Carl wrote:TTM comment:

I was just reviewing my recordings from working with Mahiri.

We were discussing Garangadon, a rhythm that I tend to think of as "beginner".

I realized that we worked on the tune for over 20 min, discussing elements of solo style and dunun variations. That's one of the coolest things about working with a mentor. You realize that there are no "easy" tunes. It's all just music, and there is so much to learn about the relationships between the parts and the dance. (Mahiri got stumped at one point because we didn't have a dancer to demonstrate the relationship of the solo to the movement of the bobo!(a piece of clothing))

Anyway, just a cool realization along the path.

C
agreed. people can learn as much as they want from CDs, Books and DVDs these days. but a lot of the nitty gritty detail, nuance, solo flavor stuff will only come from serious study with a Master or teacher or trips to africa etc. etc.

the solo style should is similar to Mamaya per MK. the dance is slow and loping with big boubous.

I played for a Mamaya type fete called a "Sede" in the village of Maradou just outside of Faranah the day after Tabaski in 2008. all of the women and girls were wearing elaborate outfits and boubous and each group for a particular surrounding village wore the same thing. each group would be "presented" before the others with music. the purpose of the fete was to show unity and solidarity and to help squash any prior conflicts etc. with some mediation help from the elders if needed.
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By Carl
#9618
It is tricky, a lot depends on your environment and cashflow.

For me, I am excited that there are finally dancers in my area. I can not vouch for there "traditional-ness" but at least it is something. At our new years gig, we had a dancer come up during balakulandjan. Didn't know her, but we made eye contact, she "asked" I said "ok" and away we went.

Afterwards, I talked with her, she had studied in Guinea for a while. Meanwhile another of my band-mates were talking to another woman who studied for quite some time in Guinea (she mentioned the school she studied at over there, I recognized the name of the leader the school was named after, but I have a terrible memory) Then there is a dance teacher that just moved into our area, I've played for a couple of her classes.

In the over 10 years that I have been playing, I have only been able to make it to a handful of dance classes, so this is a very exciting time for me. I've worked with dancers off an on over the years, but very few of them were traditional in any sense of the word. I look forward to getting one of these connections to work this year.

There is a big difference playing for the dancers, even when the material that you have is pretty accurate. There are only a couple of the solos that I "know" that I've seen danced. I am very aware that my knowledge of the solo is only "close", not quite the real thing. What I have noticed is that after learning from a good teacher (Mahiri / Mamady) when you are exposed to the dance, I have been able to pretty quickly match up to the dance. I would assume that again I am only close, hopefully closer than I would be if I hadn't "learned" from the CD/Book/DVD followed by one on one.

The point I'm trying to make is that everyone has a specific environment that will affect their ability to get into the "nitty gritty". For many people, especially if there are no dance classes available, the cd/book/dvd rout will get them started, and possibly get them to be pretty good players.

From there they might be motivated to reach out to the next level up; dance classes, and seeking out the better teachers. From there, if their finances can handle it, comes travel to the continent.

This is where I feel stuck at the moment. I can 'just' afford to work with Mahiri, and get to what I feel are a minimum number of classes with Mamady. At the moment I have no idea how I am going to be able to afford getting to Guinea even once! I would love to be able to travel there every year. The sad thing is that I could make an arrangement with my workplace to take a month off every year, so I'd at least have a job when I got back!

Bringing it back to Garangadon (and Mamaya) I have seen some dance with large boubou's, so at least I can get the idea, but again, it is only another step in getting closer to the "goal".

Peace,
C
User avatar
By e2c
#9621
I hear you, Carl. With a gap here (nobody teaching intermediate-advanced) and a slowed-down dance scene, I have to travel a good ways to get to any kind of class at all, and that costs $ (for gas, lodging, etc.). I can't afford to take a class very often, let alone spring for a major workshop, because the costs of gas and lodging have risen a good deal since fall 2008 - and also because a lot of the people who used to present workshops and conferences in the Philadelphia area aren't doing so - again, due to the financial crunch that's hitting people so hard. (Philly drummers and dancers are mostly African American and most of them just don't have the bucks that their white, middle-class counterparts often have, though everyone's feeling the squeeze these days.) I *hope* the Phila. spring conference will start up again, but that remains to be seen...

In the meantime, well... I started out taking djembe classes and playing accompaniment for dance classes at the same time, and as much as I love the music all on its own, I feel a huge void when there are no dancers to play for. It's going to be a long time before i can do anything other than hold down djembe accompaniments or duns, but that's a terrific school - allows one to see and hear what the lead drummer is doing in relationship to the dancers and their steps. (I also love seeing the dancers grow and develop - it's very rewarding!)

I would give a lot to have my previous teacher back in this area, or else to have someone new come in... we need experienced drummers who are willing to teach. (We've got some excellent drummers who could teach but have chosen not to...)

I'm not sure what the solution is. If i were able to teach at this point - even a beginner's class - I'd do it, but I'm not quite there yet and definitely don't have instruments to loan/rent. And in order to reinstate regular open dance classes, we need a couple of lead drummers (for both djembe and duns).

Gah! (Sorry for unloading, folks - this situation is extremely frustrating to me and I'm *very* anxious to take lessons/play dance accompaniment again.)
By Paul
#9640
Its a long process getting your local scene up and running even in a capital city... I am constantly frustrated in my efforts to get things up and running and its taken me years to get all my drums and a car etc... But perseverence is the only way... I didnt think I was good enough to teach for years, meanwhile lots of drum circles sprung up and they had no qualms about taking peoples money... I bring all the teachers and dance instructers I can, as apart from that I have to go to Europe (just found out a workshop i was going to is cancelled so there goes my flight money).

I would say get a group of friends together to play duns/acompaniment and try to organise a drum/dance weekend every two months... Maybe the drum teachers can sell some drums which will make them happier to come down to you... Then when you feel comfortable enough to teach you will have a community in place.

I brough over a guy called jeremy who travels round with mamady to teach and he was fantastic.. I dont think there is much point bringing an expensive teacher over now as the level isnt there and my main motivation in organising workshops is to learn myself..
User avatar
By dununbabe
#9733
michi@triodia.com wrote:One question, out of curiosity: has anyone ever failed the test and taken it a second time?

Cheers,

Michi.
the answer is YES.

However, it is not said that the person is not "good enough", just that they need more time for memorization and such. Mamady always says that, contrary to popular belief, it is not the skill level that makes the teacher, but the KNOWLEDGE. Of course that is not to say that if someones slaps or tones were not up to par that they would pass. But one does not necessarily need to be a major bad-a. to pass this test.
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By michi
#9754
the answer is YES.
Thanks for confirming. I suspected as much :)
However, it is not said that the person is not "good enough", just that they need more time for memorization and such. Mamady always says that, contrary to popular belief, it is not the skill level that makes the teacher, but the KNOWLEDGE.
OK, I'm totally not surprised. That fits right in the groove with the way Mamady lives and teaches the music. I'm sure that he would take great care to let the person know what they need to work on to give them the best chance of passing on the second attempt.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By dununbabe
#10466
michi@triodia.com wrote: I don't think that, if I get the certificate, I will ever "use" it for anything. For example, I don't think it would help me get more students. (Being able to say "TTM Certified Teacher" on my website isn't going to bring in more students, because the people who find me via the website wouldn't know what that means anyway...)
You may not "use it" like that, and it may not make a difference to the locals, (YET) but Cert teachers are listed on the TTM website, and people from all over the world will seek you out. no joke. 8 years ago I was in Idaho of all places, and I saw there was a Cert teacher in San Diego- Monette- and so when I was only a visitor here, I dropped into her classes.
User avatar
By michi
#10467
dununbabe wrote:You may not "use it" like that, and it may not make a difference to the locals, (YET) but Cert teachers are listed on the TTM website, and people from all over the world will seek you out. no joke. 8 years ago I was in Idaho of all places, and I saw there was a Cert teacher in San Diego- Monette- and so when I was only a visitor here, I dropped into her classes.
OK, I see your point, and I agree. Certainly, if I went travelling and there was a certified TTM teacher nearby, I would go to that teacher in preference to others, most likely.

I guess my point was that, to beginners, the logo means nothing. To more experienced students, it may mean something, depending on whether they have heard of TTM or not. This is why I think it would be good to try and raise the profile of the logo. I am sure that teachers would benefit if they could add the logo to their web site with a link to a TTM page that explains what it means to study with a certified teacher.

Cheers,

Michi.