For chatting and discussions.
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By michi
#7743
Carl wrote:It is also easy to focus on that when talking about the test, and talking about the "motivation" for taking the test. There is a well defined moment in time where you know exactly what will be asked of you. This makes it a lot easier to focus on what you are working for.
Yes, same for me. A well-defined goal helps me to stay on track and keep working.
However, and this is a big however, the "test" is really just a door that lets you in on a much larger process. Mamady started TTM for a reason, and he expects people involved with TTM to understand that and to be behind it. Mahiri and I have talked about Mamady's frustrations with TTM certificate holders who are not actively involved with TTM. You have to ask "why did you even take the test?" after that.
I'm pretty sure that there is plenty of scope for staying involved. For one, you can start a TTM school at some point. You can also help to organize workshops for Mamady when he is travelling, promote the workshops, organize venue, accommodation, handle registrations, etc. All that is a lot of work and, without volunteer work, the workshops would be unaffordable. Then there are Mamady's camps in Guinea. I've been encouraging my students all along to go to Africa if at all possible to experience the culture first hand, and to get a month's worth of intensive drumming. It's a great way to learn both musically and culturally. So, I'll be encouraging them to go Mamady's tour (when it happens again), and to Mamady's workshops. I can also help sell Mamady's instructional and performance CDs and DVDs, etc. etc. And, of course, I can do my bit to keep the culture alive, to explain what life in Africa is like, explain the significance of the music and dance in its wider context, and share the joy of it all.

In other words, no shortage of things I can do for TTM.

On a personal note, I am concerned with how I am going to balance my responsibilities to TTM after the test. I just got married and bought a house in the last 2 years. I can barely afford to keep the studio open as it is (actually things are starting to get better on that front). At the moment, I have no idea how I am going to pay for getting to Guinea! I'm sure something will work out, I just don't know what that will be. Fortunately Mahiri understands this, and we are working on how to make things work for everyone. A big one is time, there is a good chance that I will take the test before going to Guinea, and I will not get the certificate until I do so. But that will not change my relationship with Mahiri or what I am doing for my community through Mahiri (and hopefully Mamady in the not too distant future).
You can take only one step at a time. I'm sure there will be times in your life when the drumming will have to take second seat. But, as long as the passion for the music remains, I think you will always find scope to continue carrying the torch.

For myself, my dream is to eventually devote more time to the drumming and to create some sort of community centre around a drum and dance school. It will be years before I get there. In the mean time, the community that has formed around our classes is a good start. Two of our students are off to Africa in January, and quite a few are signing up to workshops such as Epizo's. All that helps to grow the community and to keep the Mandingue culture alive.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By Dugafola
#7745
bubudi wrote:yea you wouldn't do it for the piece of paper. although wouldn't being a ttm school mean you'd be listed on the ttm website? that could mean extra students coming your way. other than that it sounds like something you'd do purely for the challenge of doing that much work with mamady's guidance and structure. you'd have to want to have him as your baba enough to travel and take lots of workshops with him (or one of his diploma accredited teachers, as in carl's case). once you achieve the certification, you'd realise what you're capable of learning and try and be more driven to seek learning and practice opportunities to further your level. or there's always the ttm diploma...
bubs...having a Cert. and having a "school" are 2 different things. i'm not sure on the details though.
User avatar
By michi
#7747
Dugafola wrote:bubs...having a Cert. and having a "school" are 2 different things. i'm not sure on the details though.
Yes, that's the impression I get too. Presumably, to run an official school, you need additional qualifications. But I guess one thing the certificate does is provide students with some reassurance that they are getting the real deal and aren't falling prey to some pretend "wanna-be" teacher. The only problem is that the TTM brand doesn't have much brand recognition. But the more people get certified, the more that will change.

Cheers,

Michi.
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By Carl
#7750
Starting a school is a VERY big thing. There are expectations on your community as well as yourself. You need to show that you already know how to do the basics of running it as a business. You need to have a Business ID etc. You need to have a community that can support a TTM. (I'm not sure how strict they are on this, Mahiri himself has few adult students, his focus has been on children and working in schools) There is more to it than what I know at this time, but that's the general idea.

Basically, you would be opening a franchise with all of the requirements of any business arrangement. It is made a bit more complicated by the fact that TTM is a non-profit organization. The details here are a bit fuzzy for me as it involves paperwork with lots of letters and numeric abreviations. I'm a geek, but I'm not THAT big of a geek... :uglynerd:

That's only the business side of things, then there are expectations about going to the yearly TTM meeting where big things are planned. (what things? I don't know.)

The upside to all of this is that you get access to the supper secret decoder ring!

I have talked to Mahiri about this. Mostly in the context of "what would be next for me" after the certification. Right now I don't plan on even making that decision for at least 5 or more years.

Generally I've reached the point where it is more about developing the mentor / student relationship. Part of that involves developing the business side of things, but only as far as figuring out how to bring in Mahiri and eventually Mamady and whoever else I am able to get in touch with. Then, of course balancing all of that with having a life and paying the bills.

What a fun ride.

C
By bubudi
#7756
well that was my point - the next logical step after getting a ttm cert is to teach along the ttm mission/path. and that would mean either having a regular weekly class or a series of classes. you run it as a business, which is the only way to sustain it really (that's another topic altogether). in essence, a business that teaches 3 or more classes per week is a school. i am not sure if that qualifies under ttm's guidelines but in the past, that's what some of the people with diplomas have had, and to my understanding directing a ttm school is necessary to be eligible for the ttm diploma.

at any rate, as this discussion has shown, you start to see other things happen as a result of the ttm cert. you develop a relationship where you are mentored in many different ways. this includes how to spread the ttm mission and develop the community (and your business). you become part of the community of ttm teachers and help each other to survive and grow as teachers/schools and to develop a better understanding of the ttm mission (and perhaps have input in ttm meetings).
User avatar
By Carl
#7757
That's about my understanding as well. I'm pretty sure that there is more involved, but I don't have any details.

I am getting the sense that there is something additional that we haven't talked about here. I'm not sure what it is, maybe something about community involvement, but it is just a gut feeling at the moment...

C
By Paul
#7759
Nice post and good luck to anyone going for it. Mamady came here for the first time this summer an I have been thinking of this since. I learned most of my playing in Burkina and from guineans in Gambia. I have really come up against a brick wall with the rhythms I learnt... Not being able to advance them because no one else knows them.. This was fine for awhile and the lessons I took were hard and fast ballet style which has given me a strong accompaniment..

There is deffinatly something behind getting some sort of standardised level whether a black belt in karate or being able to do an extra 100m in the pool.. We are goal driven creatures..

Anyway a few questions.
1. When they say 60 rhythms, do you submit what you know and they test that.
2. Are Mamadys personal compisitions or tunes like tiriba that are adapted by him included

Im sure I will think of many more... I am already teaching here and I dont think ttm cert would make much difference... But I mainly work nights doing gigs and classes so I started a degree in development for no particular reason.. So why not do this
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By Dugafola
#7760
bubudi wrote:well that was my point - the next logical step after getting a ttm cert is to teach along the ttm mission/path. and that would mean either having a regular weekly class or a series of classes. you run it as a business, which is the only way to sustain it really (that's another topic altogether). in essence, a business that teaches 3 or more classes per week is a school. i am not sure if that qualifies under ttm's guidelines but in the past, that's what some of the people with diplomas have had, and to my understanding directing a ttm school is necessary to be eligible for the ttm diploma.
you mean certificates right? i think there are still only 4 people who have diplomas and not all of them have schools.
User avatar
By Carl
#7762
Good question, I thought that you needed the diploma in order to open a school, and there are like 17 schools or so, which doesn't jive with the 4 diplomas...

Again don't know the details.

C
By bubudi
#7766
no, i mean the diploma. you must direct a ttm school to be eligible for it. the criteria for a school director is a little flexible - mamady takes into account the years of teaching at major institutions, non-profit organisations, private, one-off workshops/camps and what have you, provided the candidate has a good internet presence and a registered business.
By bubudi
#7767
also, my understanding is that attending at least one of mamady's guinea camps was a prerequisite for the diploma, not the certificate. if it's now required for the certificate as well, then this is an indication that the criteria for both are being gradually raised.
By bubudi
#7768
Paul wrote: 1. When they say 60 rhythms, do you submit what you know and they test that.
2. Are Mamadys personal compisitions or tunes like tiriba that are adapted by him included
Im sure I will think of many more...
this was covered to some degree in the previous topic. you might find answers to more questions there. mamady's self-composed rhythms are not part of either the cert or dip test. a pyramid is required for the diploma test but it doesn't need to be one of his pyramids.
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By Dugafola
#7770
bubudi wrote:no, i mean the diploma. you must direct a ttm school to be eligible for it. the criteria for a school director is a little flexible - mamady takes into account the years of teaching at major institutions, non-profit organisations, private, one-off workshops/camps and what have you, provided the candidate has a good internet presence and a registered business.

must be flexy then...cause my buddy doesn't have a school.
User avatar
By Carl
#8177
Two things I've heard.

1) Mamady was a lot more flexible in the past than he is now as to the requirements (not sure how this affects testing)

2) Mahiri said something to the affect of "when people fail, it is because of feel" which leads me to assume that people have failed, but I don't have any more details.

One thing I wonder, is that if you are working with a teacher towards the test, they might not LET you take the test until you are ready. (saves time for everyone really)

that's what I know (now back to work...)

C