Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Advice and questions on making and fixing instruments

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby simba » Wed Nov 24, 2010 2:49 am

I only use broken used tyre which costs 10cents each.
simba
Djabarafola
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:51 am
Location: China
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby simba » Wed Nov 24, 2010 2:55 am

Tom wrote:It started in early 2005, in Conakry, when I brought the idea for the rubber tire protector to a Guinean friend mine named Basiro. Basiro mounted timing belts on djembes in a little shack next to Wann’s shop in Kameliya (Wann is one of the main exporters of Guinea djembes). It took some trial and error before we figured out that the best type of tire to use is the back tire of a street bike. I was real happy with myself, thinking that not only had I found a good way to protect the wood of the stem bottoms, but that I had found a unique way to set the appearance of our djembes apart. Well, that was short lived, because within less than a year every single shop in Conakry had adopted the technique. Now, thousands of djembes are made this way each year; not only in Guinea, but now in other West African countries as well. I can’t speak for the west coast, but djembes with rubber tire protectors are all over the east coast. Interestingly enough, even Drumskull’s supplier, who is also one of the top three exporters of Guinea djembes, builds his (non-DSD) drums with the rubber tire. BTW, we have a photo of Basiro in action on file somewhere. I’ll try to find and post it.



Thank you Tom! I'm glad to see you are the inventor of tyre foot. My job of glued tyre foot is just an upgrade of your original design. It is you who made the history. Me, just follow the history.
simba
Djabarafola
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:51 am
Location: China
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby bubudi » Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:01 am

tom did not invent the recycled tyre djembe foot. it was around well before 2005, probably since the late 90s.
bubudi
Moderator
 
Posts: 3655
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 3:56 am
Blog: View Blog (1)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Tom » Wed Nov 24, 2010 5:43 pm

And in ancient hardwood furniture, the handles are not nailed or screwed on, but bolted on the wood. That means you must make a hole in the wood before you use metal fastenings.


Yes, there different ways to make furniture; not just one way.

That's the only way to avoid cracks.


I can see we're not going to agree on that issue.

some Khadi wood classical Ming Furniture


It's troubling for me to see these photos of Khadi wood classical furniture, as I know it was
harvested in Guinea by the Chinese companies who clear cut vast forests. They gained the wood at a riculously low cost; from a corrupt government in Guinea. It was a free for all which left thousands of acres stripped and barren. Local furniture makers in Guinea are upset about it, because it has really hurt their (smaller) cottage industry of furniture production and exportation. They also blame the Chinese companies for completely wiping our the most valuable Tek (Teak) wood. Even djembe producers have been affected by it. They used to be able to (selectively) cut trees from right outside of Conakry, but now it takes a days drive to find decent hardwood trees for djembe.

It's the tyre of electrical bike. The electrical bike is overwhelming in China and motorcycle is dying out now.


I'll leave that one alone.
Tom Kondas
Wula Drum
Conakry, Guinea
http://www.wuladrum.com
User avatar
Tom
1 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 5:18 pm
Location: Conakry, Guinea
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby e2c » Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:18 pm

bubudi wrote:tom did not invent the recycled tyre djembe foot. it was around well before 2005, probably since the late 90s.

In Australia, or in Guinea?

Got some sources, b? ;)
User avatar
e2c
Djembefola
 
Posts: 2122
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 3:51 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Tom » Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:25 pm

bubudi wrote:tom did not invent the recycled tyre djembe foot. it was around well before 2005, probably since the late 90s.


Never saw one before 2005. I don't know about Australia, but definitely all that was in use on drums built in Guinea was the timing belts for the side and flat, cut rubber for the bottom. Is that what you are referring to?
Tom Kondas
Wula Drum
Conakry, Guinea
http://www.wuladrum.com
User avatar
Tom
1 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 5:18 pm
Location: Conakry, Guinea
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Tom » Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:34 pm

Thank you Tom! I'm glad to see you are the inventor of tyre foot. My job of glued tyre foot is just an upgrade of your original design. It is you who made the history. Me, just follow the history.


I just had the basic idea for it, but the guy who is really responsible for developing it is Basiro. Also, the idea I had was taken from seeing a different type of rubber tire mounted on a different type of object, so basially I just borrowed someone else's idea. It's all part of the evolution.
Tom Kondas
Wula Drum
Conakry, Guinea
http://www.wuladrum.com
User avatar
Tom
1 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 5:18 pm
Location: Conakry, Guinea
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Rhythm House Drums » Wed Nov 24, 2010 7:36 pm

It's totally a personal preference, I don't think one is better than the other.... Glues these days are just as good as nails without the risk of splitting the wood, but at the risk of bonding to the wood so that hard sanding would be required to ever remove it. Nails permanently mark the wood and overtime can come loose if not glued in as well.

I have to change my opinion from before and jump in with Tom... tacks/nails vs joinery. Two different purposes here... Joinery for fine furniture is for strength and structure. Tacks are for decoration (same with a tire... decoration and some protection). They aren't really structural so can't compare nails vs joinery in this case.

I do still maintain that it's a bad idea to nail into the end grain of a hardwood.. Overtime this can cause issues as the wood expands and contracts and the metal stays the same. But like I said before also, if the drum is kept in a stable environment, it's not an issue. If you leave it in an outdoor shed it might become an issue in a few years.. but by then there'd be other issues... like bad mojo for neglecting your djembe...

That's a gorgeous drum on your profile pic tom! :)
User avatar
Rhythm House Drums
3 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 389
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 5:27 pm
Location: Matthews NC, USA
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Tom » Wed Nov 24, 2010 8:04 pm

Subject: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Rhythm House Drums wrote:That's a gorgeous drum on your profile pic tom! :)


Thanks. That is the form that I've been trying to get to for years, although we're not 100% there yet with the stem. It is a painfully slow process to change the habits of the carvers, and especially of the rough shell carvers. BTW, the sound of that drum is unbelievably rich. It's now in Mexico.

PS-I'm curious to know which tools you are using to carve out the interiors of the drums you mentioned. What kind of results are you getting, acoustically?
Tom Kondas
Wula Drum
Conakry, Guinea
http://www.wuladrum.com
User avatar
Tom
1 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 5:18 pm
Location: Conakry, Guinea
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby bubudi » Wed Nov 24, 2010 8:32 pm

e2c wrote:
bubudi wrote:tom did not invent the recycled tyre djembe foot. it was around well before 2005, probably since the late 90s.

In Australia, or in Guinea?


epizo was putting them on his djembes in the late 90s. my friends who went to guinea between 2000 and 2002 learned to put tyre bottoms on their drums while they were there. also, many of the higher quality djembes coming into australia were shipped with rubber bottoms already on them since 2003 if not before that.

no disrespect to tom... he's doing a great job and he may well have caused the standard to lift by forcing more drum makers in guinea to fit rubber tyres on the foot of their djembes (at least the export ones). in the late 90s it was (mostly) the djembefolas, not drum makers, that were making the tyre feet. also, the bottoms that i saw during that time were usually made by cutting 3 strips of car tyre so that they could be bent into a circle to nail at the bottom (followed by a length of timing belt fixed around the side). so there has been some evolution to the basic idea...
bubudi
Moderator
 
Posts: 3655
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 3:56 am
Blog: View Blog (1)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby e2c » Wed Nov 24, 2010 8:35 pm

Thanks muchly for the clarification - that squares with Tom's comment below, I think.

Tom wrote:
bubudi wrote:tom did not invent the recycled tyre djembe foot. it was around well before 2005, probably since the late 90s.


Never saw one before 2005. I don't know about Australia, but definitely all that was in use on drums built in Guinea was the timing belts for the side and flat, cut rubber for the bottom. Is that what you are referring to?
User avatar
e2c
Djembefola
 
Posts: 2122
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 3:51 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Tom » Wed Nov 24, 2010 10:02 pm

bubudi wrote:also, the bottoms that i saw during that time were usually made by cutting 3 strips of car tyre so that they could be bent into a circle to nail at the bottom (followed by a length of timing belt fixed around the side). so there has been some evolution to the basic idea...]


Yeah, the timing belt had already been around for some time. I'd say the motorcycle tire is a significantly different technique. And that's really all it is - a technique, not an invention. The radio is an invention. BTW, I disliked the timing belts. They didn't look neat and they offered little protection (and no traction when leaning into a turn).
Tom Kondas
Wula Drum
Conakry, Guinea
http://www.wuladrum.com
User avatar
Tom
1 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 5:18 pm
Location: Conakry, Guinea
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby bubudi » Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:25 pm

yes, as i said the technique has evolved, and the amount of force needed to bend the cut car tyre pieces into a circle pretty much made gluing them in place impossible. air conditioning belts tend to have closer spaced ribs than timing belts and therefore offer a better fit and protection on the drum. i also saw ones with horizontal ribs as opposed to the vertical ribs.

i've seen the more recent rubber bottoms made from a single piece of kids' bike tyre as well as from one piece of motorbike tyre.
bubudi
Moderator
 
Posts: 3655
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 3:56 am
Blog: View Blog (1)

Re: Non-Nailing Tyre Foot Is Born...

Postby Trog » Thu Jan 27, 2011 5:13 pm

I'm with the no nail in the wood side.
I like the DSD rubber style. I bought a 4'X1' piece of 1/4" neoprene gasket material for $27 and a small can of high strength of contact cement. Which was enough to do my 3 drums with some left over. If it is a little oversize, I used a small emery wheel in my drill to finish the edges. (you want it to match the I.D so it doesn't affect the sound projection.)
Image
User avatar
Trog
1 ksing ksing
 
Posts: 141
Joined: Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:48 am
Location: Sarnia ON, Canada
Blog: View Blog (0)

Previous

Return to Instrument building and repair

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest