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Mandeng Djara by Dugafola on Thu Aug 12, 2010 10:26 pm
Mandeng Djara is Mamady's last recorded album on Fonti Musicali. a lot of the rhythms are Mamady compositions with song, kora, balaphon and of course dunun. the songs themselves are traditional songs sung by the women and children in the villages near balandougou. listen to Balandougou Kan track 1 disc 2 and you'll hear some of the same songs.

i had a Mamady moment last weekend driving home from a concert in my altered state, i decided to put on this album for the 70 minute drive after calling my wife to tell her i'm on my way and after inhaling a turkey sandwich.

now i know there are Mamady detractors, but you simply cannot deny the tastefulness of some of those intro arrangements. it's a fine balance b/w precise percussion work without being over the top in regards to the overall melodies of the rhythms....especially when playing off the bala and kora. that's the main thing that blows me away about this album...

...you can also add the telepathic conversation b/w mamady and...

[ Continued ]

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Mini-Guinea San Diego, May 2010, day 7 by michi on Wed May 05, 2010 10:51 pm
Day 7 (Tuesday) of the camp.

The intermediate group went over Deniya again and then started a new rhythm (6/8) called Sumalo. This rhythm was composed by Mamady and dates back to 1964. It was part of Ballet Djoliba's first repertoire, created on Kassa Island off the coast of Conakry. The ballet performance was called "The Mother". There was a king called Sumalo who was killed in a war. The king's son went to his mother and said "Give me my father's sword so I can go to the war and avenge his death." The son goes to fight in the war and gets killed as well. The performance piece was quite patriotic, reflecting the recent revolutionary spirit of the time. The woman who played the mother is called Fatadabo and now works in Mamady's household in Conakry.

Another interesting snippet about Ballet Djoliba... Of the 500 people who were originally selected from the regional competitions and moved to Kassa Island, 45 were selected to form what eventually became Ballet Djoliba....

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Why the djembe matters to me (Part 1) by michi on Tue Mar 30, 2010 4:19 am
I've been thinking of writing down this story for about three years. Both for my own sake, because I think it is useful to reflect on the past, but also because I think other people might find something here that will touch them. This is a very personal account of why the djembe matters to me and why I continue to pursue Mandingue music. Mine is only one story out of thousands; the djembe has many ways to teach what people need to learn…

My name is Michi, and I live in Brisbane, Australia. I'm 50 years old now, and I've been drumming for six years—with a passion. The way I found the djembe is tied up with my upbringing and life as an adult, and with my journey from music to science and back.

Music and the performing arts were a big part of my early life. I was born and raised in Germany as the son of a professional musician. I grew up literally swimming in music and was recognised as musically gifted from an early age. I played harmonica by the time I was three, picked out simple tun...

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translate by buisson on Sun Feb 21, 2010 4:12 pm
comment voir ce forum en français SVP ? merci
je vous envois des rayons de soleil !

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My trip to Mali - Leaving France by James on Fri Feb 18, 2011 12:12 pm
My trip to Mali didn't start too well. What should have been a 4/5 hour flight turned into a 9 hour extravaganza.

I noticed that there was a couple of people walking around the plance with orange arm bands that say police on them. One of them address the airplane, but spoke too quickly and I lost him early, so I had no idea about what was to come.

The flight was about 15 minutes late when a police van pulled up beside the plane and 2 people carried a man in a straight jacket kicking and screaming into the plane.

I quickly put 2+1 together and reasoned that it must be a deportee, and indeed I wasn't wrong. They had cleared 3 rows at the back of the plane and they needed every inch of space to try and contain this guy.

The moment he came on board he wouldn't stop screaming "France chez moi, France chez moi"("France is my home, France is my home"). You can't imagine how disturbing this was, and it only took a few minutes before people started to protest.

6/7 people...

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