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Mini-Guinea San Diego, April 2010, day 4 by michi on Fri Apr 30, 2010 5:57 am
Today's Group 1 class finished off Zaouli 6. We spent quite a bit of time at the end of the class having fun, playing Zaouli and using breaks 5 and 6.

Group 2 is struggling a bit with Zaouli 7 and isn't through learning the break yet. About a third of it still remains to learn.

The pyramid class continued to work on Mamady's insane break (and actually finished it--sound clip below). During the pyramid class, Mamady passed on a lot of interesting info. First up, I got the origin of this break wrong: Mamady didn't do this in his Ivory Coast days in the Eighties, but earlier, in Guinea in 1977, which is when he composed the entire pyramid.

Mamady related quite a bit of the history of the ballets. Basically, the early ballets were modelled on the European ballets, where the orchestra was hidden in an orchestra pit, so it wouldn't distract the audience from the dance. With the African ballets, they did the same, only the musicians were hidden in the side stage. (If you watch early Ballet...

[ Continued ]

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Djaa by Dugafola on Fri Aug 13, 2010 5:37 pm
Bolokada taught Djaa last night with a little arrangement.

interesting tidbit...Bolo told us that he loves Djaa because it's the rhythm/occasion that made him famous in his region. he is a folkloric specialist for all types occasions: weddings, safinamalos, dembadon, baptisms, circumcision, dennabos, kassa, mendiani, kawa etc...but the Djalaban is where it all started.

he explained there are two basic occasions for djaa: the first being the fete/party for young people and the second being the Djalaban - the last "dance" or "fete" for a young woman about to be wed. Djalaban is the first fete in the wedding sequence. the second is the safinamalo(i also got to play a safina...another blog for another time), third is dembadon, and the fourth is the actual marriage. the woman to be married doesn't even get to dance at her own party. she's not even really present until they process her out and her friends and family (all female) dance and sing around her. at the...

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Forokoroba - Looking for info on this rhythm by kbmountain@gmail.com on Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:35 pm
Nov 2013, in Guinea, I learned a dance to a rhythm called Forokoroba. After asking my teachers to say it repeatedly, that is how I believe it is spelled ... or at least sounds like it's spelled. I was told it is a Malinke welcoming and celebration rhythm. They likened it to a Yankadi, a happy, feel good "swingy" rhythm. I can not find any history or drum notation on it. I have found a few work shop videos of it being taught in dance classes in France. Can anyone provide me with more information on Forokoroba? Thank you.

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Visit The Practice of Practice: How Musicians Learn by jharnum on Thu Jul 07, 2011 8:06 pm
Tried to get this to clone my actual blog, but no luck. If you'd like, check out my blog/podcast about music practice wherein I discuss and talk to master musicians about music practice:

http://intentionalpractice.wordpress.com

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Gambia by Jacab on Fri Nov 27, 2009 1:47 pm
Hi, I am going to Gambia on the 7th December 2009, I am going on my own and staying at Kotu beach and want to get in as much drumming as I can am pretty new to Djembie but love it, so would be grateful for any info am on a bit of a tight budget Gwen

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