Blog Stats
70Total Entries
106Total Comments
Search Blogs

Feed Random Blog Entries
Drumming under water by michi on Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:32 am
Well, here I am in Queensland (the Sunshine State), and three quarters of the state have been declared a disaster area. The recent floods are the worst natural disaster in Australia's history (in extent, not in terms of loss of life fortunately).

Queensland is a large state. To give you an idea how large, take Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. All together, they are not quite as large as Queensland. You need to add Massachusetts and Connecticut to make up the difference. Or, if you want to put it differently, Queensland is has almost exactly 20% of the land area of the entire United States. Three quarters of that are flooded or severely affected by flood.

Queensland has experienced very serious losses of crops and livestock. Infrastructure is seriously damaged everywhere. Roads, bridges, water supply, electricity, communications, etc. It is difficult to ensure supply of essential goods to many areas that are cut off by the floods. Supermarkets are low or empty...

[ Continued ]

6 Comments Viewed 167235 times
Visit The Practice of Practice: How Musicians Learn by jharnum on Thu Jul 07, 2011 8:06 pm
Tried to get this to clone my actual blog, but no luck. If you'd like, check out my blog/podcast about music practice wherein I discuss and talk to master musicians about music practice:

http://intentionalpractice.wordpress.com

1 Comment Viewed 36481 times
Gambia by Jacab on Fri Nov 27, 2009 1:47 pm
Hi, I am going to Gambia on the 7th December 2009, I am going on my own and staying at Kotu beach and want to get in as much drumming as I can am pretty new to Djembie but love it, so would be grateful for any info am on a bit of a tight budget Gwen

2 Comments Viewed 19140 times
Mini-Guinea Singapore, Sep 2010, Day 8-9 by michi on Fri Sep 24, 2010 1:32 am
Day 8:

The intermediate group learned two rhythms. The first one was Sewa (which I believe Mamady created himself—I missed the start of the session, so I have no background info on it). The rhythm has a distinct Ivory Coast feel to it. The dunduns are played upright without bells, and the accompaniments are similar to Bete and Begbe (both from Ivory Coast). The second rhythm was Kotedjuga. (It's called Kotedjuga in Guinea and Koredjuga in Mali.)

Mamady improvised to Kotedjuga at the end of the session. Here is a recording.

The advanced group worked on Mamady's solo technique for Soliwulen. Most people were struggling severely with the last two techniques, which require precise micro-timing to sound right.

Mamady improvised to Soliwulen, which was a treat. You can listen to it here.

...

[ Continued ]

3 Comments Viewed 105867 times
kamele n'goni by vinny_musician on Wed Aug 25, 2010 2:55 am
I am looking to buy a 12 stringed kamele n'goni, does enyone where I can find one?

0 Comments Viewed 5060 times

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Magpie Crawler [Bot]